Michael Bane

Catholic Memorial

#1

Michael Bane /
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Is primus vicit Helvetios , qui nunc Sequani appellantur , deinde vicendo per bella gravissima usque ad Oceanum Britannicum processit . Domuit autem annis novem fere omnem Galliam , quae inter Alpes , flumen Rhodanum , Rhenum et Oceanum est .
He first conquered the Helvetians , who now are called the Sequani , then he proceeded as far as the British Ocean by conquering through most serious wars . Moreover , in nearly nine years , he subdued all of Gaul , which is between the Alps , the Rhone river , the Rhine river , and the ocean
He first conquered the Helvetians , who now are named the Sequani , then by conquering through the most gravest war he proceeded to the British Channel . He conquered however , almost all of Gaul in 9 years , which is between the Alps , the Rhone river , the Rhine River , and the ocean

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de bello 1

Michael Bane /
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DBG 4.1

Michael Bane /
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De Bello Gallico 4.12

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De Bello Gallico 7.68-7.69

Michael Bane /
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All his cavalry being routed , Vercingetorix led back his troops in the same order as he had arranged them before the camp , and immediately began to march to Alesia , which is a town of the Mandubii , and ordered the baggage to be speedily brought forth from the camp , and follow him closely . Caesar , having conveyed his baggage to the nearest hill , and having left two legions to guard it , pursued as far as the time of day would permit , and after slaying about three thousand of the rear of the enemy , encamped at Alesia on the next day . On reconnoitering the situation of the city , finding that the enemy were panic-stricken , because the cavalry in which they placed their chief reliance , were beaten , he encouraged his men to endure the toil , and began to draw a line of circumvallation round Alesia .

The town itself was situated on the top of a hill , in a very lofty position , so that it did not appear likely to be taken , except by a regular siege . Two rivers , on two different sides , washed the foot of the hill . Before the town lay a plain of about three miles in length ; on every other side hills at a moderate distance , and of an equal degree of height , surrounded the town . The army of the Gauls had filled all the space under the wall , comprising a part of the hill which looked to the rising sun , and had drawn in front a trench and a stone wall six feet high . The circuit of that fortification , which was commenced by the Romans , comprised eleven miles . The camp was pitched in a strong position , and twenty-three redoubts were raised in it , in which sentinels were placed by day , lest any sally should be made suddenly ; and by night the same were occupied by watches and strong guards .

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Latin Final Project Text Alignment

Michael Bane /
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LATIN TEXT

Book 1 , Chapter 53
Aspendum vetus oppidum et nobile in Pamphylia scitis esse , plenissimum signorum optimorum . non dicam illinc hoc signum ablatum esse et illud : hoc dico , nullum te Aspendi signum , Verres , reliquisse , omnia ex fanis , ex locis publicis , palam , spectantibus omnibus , plaustris [ Note ] evecta exportataque esse . atque etiam illum Aspendium citharistam , de quo saepe audistis id quod est Graecis [ Note ] hominibus in proverbio , quem omnia ' intus [ Note ] canere ' dicebant , sustulit et in intimis suis aedibus posuit , ut etiam illum ipsum suo artificio [ Note ] superasse videatur .

Book 1 , Chapter 54
Pergae fanum antiquissimum et sanctissimum Dianae scimus esse : id quoque a te nudatum ac spoliatum esse , ex ipsa Diana quod habebat auri detractum atque ablatum esse dico . quae , malum , est ista tanta audacia atque amentia ! quas enim sociorum atque amicorum urbis adisti legationis iure et nomine , si in eas [ Note ] vi cum exercitu imperioque invasisses , tamen , opinor , quae signa atque [ Note ] ornamenta ex iis [ Note ] urbibus sustulisses , haec non in tuam domum neque in suburbana amicorum , sed Romam in publicum deportasses .

Book 1 , Chapter 55
quid ego de M . Marcello loquar , qui Syracusas , urbem ornatissimam , cepit ? quid de L . Scipione , qui bellum in Asia gessit Antiochumque , regem potentissimum , vicit ? quid de Flaminino , qui regem Philippum et Macedoniam subegit ? quid de L . Paulo [ Note ] , qui regem Persen vi ac virtute superavit ? quid de L . Mummio , qui urbem pulcherrimam atque ornatissimam , Corinthum , plenissimam rerum omnium , sustulit , urbisque Achaiae Boeotiaeque multas sub imperium populi Romani dicionemque subiunxit ? quorum domus , cum honore ac virtute florerent , signis et tabulis pictis erant vacuae ; at vero urbem totam templaque [ Note ] deorum omnisque Italiae partis illorum donis ac monumentis exornatas videmus .
ACTUAL TRANSLATIONS

Book 1 , Chapter 53
You know that Aspendus is an ancient and noble town in Pamphylia , full of very fine statues . I do not say that one statue or another was taken away from thence : this I say , that you , O Verres , left not one statue at Aspendus ; that everything from the temples and from all public places was openly seized and carried away on wagons , the citizens all looking on . And he even carried off that harp-player of Aspendus , of whom you have often heard the saying , which is a proverb among the Greeks , who used to say that he could sing everything within himself , and put him in the inmost part of his own house , so as to appear to have surpassed the statue itself in trickery .

Book 1 , Chapter 54
At Perga , we are aware that there is a very ancient and very holy temple of Diana . That too , I say , was stripped and plundered by you ; and all the gold which there was on Diana herself was taken off and carried away . What , in the name of mischief , can such audacity and inanity mean ? In the very cities of our friends and allies , which you visited under the pretext of your office as a lieutenant , if you had stormed them by force with an army , and had exercised military rule there ; still , I think , the statues and ornaments which you took away , you would have carried , not to your own house , nor to the suburban villas of your friends , but to Rome for the public use .

Book 1 , Chapter 55
Why should I speak of Marcus Marcellus , who took Syracuse , that most beautiful city ? why of Lucius Scipio , who waged war in Asia , and conquered Antiochus , a most powerful monarch ? why of Flaminius , who subdued Philip the king , and Macedonia ? why of Lucius Paullus , who with his might and valor conquered king Perses ? why of Lucius Mummius , who overthrew that most beautiful and elegant city Corinth , full of all sorts of riches , and brought many cities of Achaia and Boeotia under the empire and dominion of the Roman people ? —their houses , though they were rich in virtue and honor , were empty of statues and paintings . But we see the whole city , the temples of the gods , and all parts of Italy , adorned with their gifts , and with memorials of them .
OUR TRANSLATIONS

Book 1 , Chapter 53
You know that Apsendus is a town in Pamphylia , long-standing and well-born , crowded with pleasant statues . I say by no means was a statue or another taken from there . I say this , that you , Verres , left no statue in Apsendus , all were openly taken from the public places and temple and carried out on wagons . And also that cithara player of Apsendus was carried off , of whom you have frequently heard his saying which is a saying around the Greeks , who had said that he could sing all within him so that it would seem to have done the statue itself in guile .

Book 1 , Chapter 54
We know that there is an aged and consecrated temple of Dianna in Perga . I say that likewise it was laid bare and robbed by you , even all of the gold on Dianna herself was removed and stolen . What , wickedness , could so much recklessness and craziness mean ! In the very cities of our allies and friends , which you entered under the title of your duty of ambassador if with an army you invaded them by violence and enforced supreme power there . Nevertheless , I believe , the statues and decorations you stole , you would not have brought them not to your own dwelling , nor to the country houses of your friends , but to Rome among the public view .

Book 1 , Chapter 55
Why should I mention Manius Marcellus , who captured Syracuse the most richly adorned city ? Why should I speak of Lucius Scipio , who waged war in Asia and captured Antiochus , the most powerful king ? Why should I talk about Flaminius , who conquered Macedonia , and Philip the king ? Why should I utter about Lucius Paulo , who with his strength and power overcame the king of Persia ? Why should I speak of Lucius Mummius , who overthrew Corinth , the most illustrious and honored city , full of all things , and subdued numerous cities of Achaia and Boeotia under the authority and dominion of the Roman people ? Their houses , which flourish with grace and power , were vacant of statues and painted tablets . Whereas in truth we see the whole city and the god’s temples , and all of Italy’s parts that are furnished with gifts and memorials .

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