Catullus 8

Max Fan /
  • Created on 2018-05-18 14:42:29
  • Modified on 2018-05-18 14:50:59
  • Aligned by Max Fan
Latin
English
English
Miser Catulle , desinas ineptire ,
et quod vides perisse perditum ducas .
fulsere quondam candidi tibi soles ,
cum ventitabas quo puella ducebat
amata nobis quantum amabitur nulla .
ibi illa multa tum iocosa fiebant ,
quae tu volebas nec puella nolebat ,
fulsere vere candidi tibi soles .
nunc iam illa non vult : tu quoque impotens noli ,
nec quae fugit sectare , nec miser vive ,
sed obstinata mente perfer , obdura .
vale puella , iam Catullus obdurat ,
nec te requiret nec rogabit invitam .
at tu dolebis , cum rogaberis nulla .
scelesta , vae te , quae tibi manet vita ?
quis nunc te adibit ? cui videberis bella ?
quem nunc amabis ? cuius esse diceris ?
quem basiabis ? cui labella mordebis ?
at tu , Catulle , destinatus obdura .
Wretched Catullus , you should stop being silly ,
and you should consider destroyed what you see was lost .
The sun used to shine white to you ,
When you coming often to where the girl lead
Having been loved by us as much as no girl will ever be loved .
There those many pleasant things then happen
which you wished , and the girl doesn’t not willing
The sun truly was shining bright on you
Now already she does not want you , you are powerless don’t
And don’t follow she who runs away , and don’t live wretchedly
but the determined mind you carry , you persist with
goodbye girl , now Catullus persists
And , Catullus will not seek you and will not ask for you unwillingly
but you will be hurt , when you won’t be asked by anyone
wicked Lesbia , darn you , what life remains to you ?
Now who will approach you ? To whom will you seem pretty ?
Now who will you love ? Whose will you be spoken of to be ?
Who will you kiss ? To whom you will nibble their lips ?
But you , Catullus , persist determinedly .
Woe-full Catullus ! cease to play the fool
And what thou seest dead as dead regard !
Whilòme the sheeniest suns for thee did shine
When oft-a-tripping whither led the girl
By us beloved , as shall none be loved .
There all so merry doings then were done
After thy liking , nor the girl was loath .
Then certès sheeniest suns for thee did shine .
Now she ' s unwilling : thou too ( hapless ! ) will
Her flight to follow , and sad life to live :
Endure with stubborn soul and still obdure .
Damsel , adieu ! Catullus obdurate grown
Nor seeks thee , neither asks of thine unwill ;
Yet shalt thou sorrow when none woos thee more ;
Reprobate ! Woe to thee ! What life remains ?
Who now shall love thee ? Who ' ll think thee fair ?
Whom now shalt ever love ? Whose wilt be called ?
To whom shalt kisses give ? whose liplets nip ?
But thou ( Catullus ! ) destiny-doomed obdure .

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Catullus 8 (revised)

Max Fan /
  • Created on 2018-05-18 14:54:44
  • Modified on 2018-05-21 04:59:01
  • Translated by MF
  • Aligned by Max Fan
Latin
English
English
Miser Catulle , desinas ineptire ,
et quod vides perisse perditum ducas .
fulsere quondam candidi tibi soles ,
cum ventitabas quo puella ducebat
amata nobis quantum amabitur nulla .
ibi illa multa tum iocosa fiebant ,
quae tu volebas nec puella nolebat ,
fulsere vere candidi tibi soles .
nunc iam illa non vult : tu quoque impotens noli ,
nec quae fugit sectare , nec miser vive ,
sed obstinata mente perfer , obdura .
vale puella , iam Catullus obdurat ,
nec te requiret nec rogabit invitam .
at tu dolebis , cum rogaberis nulla .
scelesta , vae te , quae tibi manet vita ?
quis nunc te adibit ? cui videberis bella ?
quem nunc amabis ? cuius esse diceris ?
quem basiabis ? cui labella mordebis ?
at tu , Catulle , destinatus obdura .
Wretched Catullus , you should stop being silly ,
and you should consider destroyed what you see was lost .
The sun used to shine white to you ,
When you coming often to where the girl lead
Having been loved by us as much as no girl will ever be loved .
There those many pleasant things then happen
which you wished , and the girl doesn’t not willing
The sun truly was shining bright on you
Now already she does not want you , you are powerless don’t
And don’t follow she who runs away , and don’t live wretchedly
but the determined mind you carry , you persist with
goodbye girl , now Catullus persists
And , Catullus will not seek you and will not ask for you unwillingly
but you will be hurt , when you won’t be asked by anyone
wicked Lesbia , darn you , what life remains to you ?
Now who will approach you ? To whom will you seem pretty ?
Now who will you love ? Whose will you be spoken of to be ?
Who will you kiss ? Whose lips will you nibble ?
But you , Catullus , persist determinedly .
Woe-full Catullus ! cease to play the fool
And what thou seest dead as dead regard !
Whilòme the sheeniest suns for thee did shine
When oft-a-tripping whither led the girl
By us beloved , as shall none be loved .
There all so merry doings then were done
After thy liking , nor the girl was loath .
Then certès sheeniest suns for thee did shine .
Now she ' s unwilling : thou too ( hapless ! ) will
Her flight to follow , and sad life to live :
Endure with stubborn soul and still obdure .
Damsel , adieu ! Catullus obdurate grown
Nor seeks thee , neither asks of thine unwill ;
Yet shalt thou sorrow when none woos thee more ;
Reprobate ! Woe to thee ! What life remains ?
Who now shall love thee ? Who ' ll think thee fair ?
Whom now shalt ever love ? Whose wilt be called ?
To whom shalt kisses give ? whose liplets nip ?
But thou ( Catullus ! ) destiny-doomed obdure .

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Metamorphoses 1:18-20

Amanda Cameron /
  • Created on 2018-09-21 05:21:27
  • Modified on 2018-10-14 03:58:36
  • Translated by A.S. Kline
  • Aligned by Amanda Cameron
English
Latin
English
We were quite a way off before the sun rose , lighting everything . Carefully , since I was curious , I examined the place on my friend’s neck where I’d seen the blade enter , I said to myself : ‘You’re mad , you were in your cups and sodden with wine , and had a dreadful nightmare . Look , Socrates is sound and whole , totally unscathed . Where are the wound and the sponge ? Where’s the deep and recent scar ? I turned to him : ‘Those doctors are not without merit who say that swollen with food and drink we have wild and oppressive dreams . Take me now . I took too much to drink last evening , and a bad night brought such dire and violent visions I still feel as though I was spattered , polluted with human blood .

He grinned at that : ‘It’s piss not blood you’re soaked with . I dreamed too , that my throat was cut . I felt the pain in my neck , and even thought my heart had been torn from my body . And now I’m still short of breath , and my knees are trembling , and I’m staggering along , and I need a bite to eat to restore my spirits .

‘Here’s breakfast , I said ‘all ready for you , and I swung the sack from my shoulder and quickly handed him bread and cheese . ‘Let’s sit by that plane tree , I said . Having done so , I took something from the sack for myself , and watched him eating avidly , but visibly weaker , somehow more drawn and emaciated , and with the pallor of boxwood . In short the colour of his flesh was so disturbing it conjured up the vision of those Furies of the night before , and my terror was such the first bit of bread I took , though only a small one , struck in my throat , and it wouldn’t go down , or come back up . The absence of anyone else on the road added to my fear . Who could believe my companion was murdered , and I was innocent ? Now he , when he’d had enough , began to feel quite thirsty , since he’d gobbled the best part of a whole cheese in his eagerness . A gentle stream flowed sluggishly not far from the plane-tree’s roots , flowing on through a quiet pool , the colour of glass or silver . ‘Here , I cried , ‘quench your thirst with the milky waters of this spring . He rose and after a brief search for a level place at the edge of the bank , he sank down on his knees and bent forward ready to drink . But his lips had not yet touched the surface of the water when in a trice the wound in his throat gaped open , and out flew the sponge , with a little trickle of blood . Then his lifeless body pitched forward , almost into the stream , except that I caught at one of his legs , and with a mighty effort dragged him higher onto the bank . I mourned for him there , as much as circumstance allowed , and covered him with sandy soil to rest there forever beside the water . Then trembling and fearful of my life I fled through remote and pathless country , like a man with murder on his conscience , abandoning home and country , embracing voluntary exile . Now I live in Aetolia , and I’m married again .

So Aristomenes’ story ended . But his friend , who had obstinately refused to believe a word from the very start , said : ‘There was never a taller tale , never a more absurd mendacity . And he turned to me : ‘You’re a cultured chap , as your clothes and manner show , can you credit a fable like that ?

I replied : ‘I judge that nothing’s impossible , and whatever the fates decide is what happens to mortal men . Now I and you and everyone experience many a strange and almost incredible event that is unbelievable when told to someone who wasn’t there . And as for Aristomenes , not only do I believe him , but by Hercules I thank him greatly for amusing us with his charming and delightful tale . I forgot about the pain of travel , and wasn’t bored on that last rough stretch of road . And I think the horse is happy too since , without him tiring , I’ve been carried all the way to the city gate here , not by his back but my ears !

Aliquantum processeramus et iam iubaris exortu cuncta collustrantur , et ego curiose sedulo arbitrabar iugulum comitis , qua parte gladium delapsum videram , et mecum ‘Vesane , aio ‘Qui poculis et vino sepultus extrema somniasti . Ecce Socrates integer , sanus , incolumis . Ubi vulnus ? Spongia ubi ? Ubi postremum cicatrix tam alta , tam recens ? et ad illum Ne’ inquam ‘Immerito medici fidi cibo et crapula distentos saeva ei gravia somniare autumant : mihi denique quod poculis vesperi minus temperavi , nox acerba diras et truces imagines obtulit , ut adhuc me credam cruore humano aspersum atque impiatum . Ad haec ille subridens ‘At tu’ inquit ‘Non sanguine I sed lotio perfusus es , verum tamen et ipse per somnium iugulari visus sum mihi . Nam et iugulum istum dolui et cor ipsum mihi avelli putavi et nunc etiam spiritu deficior et genua quatior et gradu titubo et I aliquid cibatus refovendo spiritu desidero . ‘En’ inquam Paratum tibi adest ientaculum , et cum dicto manticam meam numero exuo , caseum cum pane propere ei porrigo , et ‘Iuxta platanum istam residamus’ aio .

Quo facto et ipse aliquid indidem sumo , eumque avide esitantem aspicio aliquanto intentiore macie atque pallore buxeo deficientem video . Sic denique eum vitalis color turbaverat ut mihi prae metu , nocturnas etiam Furias illas imaginanti , frustulum panis quod primum sumpseram , quamvis admodum modicum , mediis faucibus inhaereret , ac neque deorsum demeare neque sursum remeare posset . Nam et crebritas ipsa commeantium metum mihi cumulabat : quis enim de duobus comitum alterum sine alterius noxa peremptum crederet ? Verum ille , ut satis detruncaverat cibum , sitire impatienter coeperat ; nam et optimi casei bonam partem avide devoraverat , et haud ita longe radices platani lenis fluvius in speciem placidae paludis ignavus ibat argento vel vitro aemulus in colorem . En inquam Explere latice fontis lacteo . Assurgit ille et oppertus paululum planiorem ripae marginem complicitus in genua appronat se avidus affectans poculum : necdum satis extremis labiis summum aquae rorem attigerat , et iugulo eius vulnus dehiscit in profundum patorem , et illa spongia de eo repente devolvitur eamque parvus admodum comitatur cruor : denique corpus examinatum in flumen paene cernuat , nisi ego altero eius pede retento vix et aegre ad ripam superiorem attraxi , ubi defletum pro tempore comitem misellum arenosa humo in amnis vicinia sempiterna contexi . Ipse trepidus et exinde metuens mihi per diversas et avias solitudines aufugi et quasi conscius mihi caedis humanae relicta patria et Lare ultroneum exilium amplexus nune Aetoliam novo contracto matrimonio colo .

Haec Aristomenes . At ille comes eius , qui statim initio obstinata incredulitate sermonem eius respuebat , ‘Nihil’ inquit ‘Hac fabula fabulosius , nihil isto mendacio absurdius , et ad me conversus Tu autem inquit Vir , ut habitus et habitudo demonstrat , ornatus , accredis1huic fabulae ? ‘Ego vero’ inquam ‘Nihil impossibile arbitror , sed utcumque fata decreverint , ita cuncta mortalibus provenire : nam et mihi et tibi et cunctis hominibus multa usu venire mira et paene infecta , quae tamen ignaro relata fidem perdant . Sed ego huic et credo Hercule et gratas gratias memini , quod lepidae fabulae festivitate nos avocavit ; asperam denique ac prolixam viam sine labore ae taedio evasi . Quod beneficium etiam illum vectorem meum credo laetari : sine fatigatione sui me usque ad istam civitatis portam non dorso illius sed meis auribus provecto .
‘When we had gone some way the sun rose ; and now that it was
fully light , I looked very closely at my friend’s neck where I had seen
the sword go in , and I said to myself : " You’re crazy ; you were dead
drunk and had a horrible dream . There’s Socrates whole , sound and
unharmed . Where’s the wound ? Where’s the sponge ? And where’s
the fresh deep scar ? " Aloud I said : " The doctors are quite right when
they tell us that eating and drinking too much causes nightmares .
Look at me ; I had a drop too much yesterday evening , and I passed a
night of such dreadful threatening dreams that I still can’t believe I’m
not spattered and defiled with human gore . " He smiled and said : " It’s
not blood but piss you were drenched with . But to tell the truth , I too
had a dream , that my throat was cut ; I had a pain there , and I
thought the heart was plucked out of me and even now I feel faint ,
my knees are trembling and I can’t walk properly . I think I need
something to eat to put the life back in me . " " Right , " I answered ,
" I’ve got some breakfast all ready for you , " and taking off my
knapsack I quickly gave him some bread and cheese , adding , " let’s sit
down under that plane tree . "

‘This we did , and I too had a little something . He was eating
greedily , but as I watched him , I saw that his face was becoming
drawn and waxy pale , and his strength seemed to be ebbing away .
Indeed he was so altered by this deathly change of complexion that I
panicked , thinking of those Furies of last night ; and the first piece of
bread I’d taken , not a very big one , lodged right in my throat and
refused either to go down or to come back up . What increased my
alarm was that there was almost nobody about . Who was going to
believe that one of a pair of companions had been done in without
foul play on the part of the other ? Meanwhile Socrates , having made
short work of the food , became desperately thirsty , as well he might ,
having wolfed down the best part of a first-rate cheese . Not far from
the plane tree there flowed a gentle stream , its current so slow that it
looked like a placid pool , all silver and glass . " There , " I said , " quench
your thirst in that limpid spring . " He got up , and finding a place that
sloped down to the water , he knelt and leaned over eagerly to drink .
He had hardly touched the surface with his lips when the wound in
his throat gaped wide open to the bottom and the sponge shot out ,
followed by a little blood . His lifeless body nearly pitched headlong
into the water , but I managed to get hold of one foot and drag him
laboriously up the bank . There , after mourning him as best I could in
the circumstances , I covered my unfortunate friend with the sandy
soil to rest there for ever by the river . Then , panic-stricken and in
fear of my life , I made my escape through remote and pathless
wildernesses ; and like a man with murder on his conscience I left
country and home to embrace voluntary exile . And now I have
remarried and live in Aetolia .

That was Aristomenes’ story . His companion , who from the start
had remained stubbornly incredulous and would have no truck with
what he told us , broke out : ‘Of all the fairytales that were ever
invented , of all the lies that were ever told , that takes the biscuit’ ; and
turning to me , ‘But you , he said , ‘to judge from your dress and
appearance you’re an educated man do you go along with this
stuff ? ‘Well , I said , ‘my opinion is that nothing is impossible and
that we mortals get whatever the Fates have decided for us . You , I ,
everybody , we all meet with many amazing and unprecedented
experiences , which aren’t believed when they’re told to somebody
who lacks first-hand knowledge of them . But I do , I assure you ,
believe our friend here , and I’m most grateful to him for diverting us
with such a charming and delightful story . Here I’ve got to the end of
this long and rugged road without effort and haven’t been bored . I
believe my horse too thinks you’ve done him a favour , for without tiring him I see I’ve reached the city gates transported not on his
back but , you might say , by my ears .

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Apuleius Metamorphoses 5.25-27

Luke Garges /
  • Created on 2018-09-28 19:58:18
  • Modified on 2018-10-15 05:42:25
  • Translated by A.S. Kline
  • Aligned by Luke Garges
Latin
English
English
Psyche vero humi prostrata et quantum visui poterat volatus mariti prospiciens extremis affligebat lamentationibus animum . Sed ubi remigio plumae raptum maritum proceritas spatii fecerat alienum , per proximi fluminis marginem praecipitem sese dedit : sed mitis fluvius in honorem dei scilicet , qui et ipsas aquas urere consuevit , metuens sibi confestim eam innoxio volumine super ripam florentem herbis exi posuit . Tunc forte Pan deus rusticus iuxta superi cilium amnis sedebat , complexus Echo montanam deam eamque voculas omnimodas edocens recinere ; proxime ripam vago pastu lasciviunt , comam fluvii tondentes , capellae . Hircuosus deus sauciam Psychen atque defectam , utcumque casus eius non inscius , clementer ad se vocatam sic permulcet verbis lenientibus : Puella scitula , sum quidem rusticanus et upilio , sed senectutis prolixae beneficio multis experimentis instructus . Verum si recte coniecto , quod profecto prudentes viri divinationem autumant , ab isto titubante et saepius vacillante vestigio deque nimio pallore corporis et assiduo suspiritu , immo ei ipsis marcentibus oculis tuis , amore nimio laboras . Ergo mihi ausculta , nec te rursus praecipitio vel ullo mortis accersitae genere perimas . Luctum desine et pone maerorem precibusque potius Cupidinem deorum maximum percole , et utpote adolescentem delicatum luxuriosumque blandis obsequiis promerere .

Sic locuto deo pastore , nulloque sermone reddito sed adorato tantum numine salutari , Psyche pergit ire . Sed cum aliquam multum viae laboranti vestigio pererrasset , inscio quodam tramite , iam die labente , accedit quandam civitatem , in qua regnum maritus unius sororis eius obtinebat . Qua re cognita Psyche nuntiari praesentiam suam sorori desiderat ; mox inducta , mutuis amplexibus alternae salutationis expletis , percontanti causas adventus sui sic incipit : Meministi consilium vestrum , scilicet quo mihi suasistis ut bestiam , quae mariti mentito nomine mecum quiescebat , prius quam ingluvie voraci me misellam hauriret , ancipiti novacula peremerem ? Sed cum primum , ut aeque placuerat , conscio lumine vultus eius aspexi , video mirum divinumque prorsus spectaculum ; ipsum illum deae Veneris filium , ipsum inquam Cupidinem leni quiete sopitum . Ac dum tanti boni spectaculo percita et nimia voluptatis copia turbata fruendi laborarem inopia , casu scilicet pessimo lucerna fervens oleum rebullivit in eius numerum . Quo dolore statim somno recussus , ubi me ferro et igni conspexit armatam , Tu quideminquitOb istud tam dirum facinus confestim toro meo divorte tibique res tuas habeto , ego vero sororem tuam —et nomen quo tu censeris aiebat— Iam mihi confestim farreatis nuptiis coniugabo , et statim Zephyri praecipit ultra terminos me domus eius efflaret .

Necdum sermonem Psyche finierat ; illa vesanae libidinis et invidiae noxiae stimulis agitata , e re concinnato mendacio fallens maritum , quasi de morti parentum aliquid comperisset , statim navem ascendi ! et ad illum scopulum protinus pergit , et quamvis alio flante vento , caeca spe tamen inhians , Accipe me dicens Cupido , dignam te coniugem et tu , Zephyre , suscipe dominam ! saltu se maximo praecipitem dedit Nec tamen ad illum locum vel saltem mortua pervenire potuit : nam per saxa cautium membris iactatis atque dissipatis et proinde ut merebatur lacerata visceribus suis alitibus bestiisque obvium ferens pabulum interiit . Nec vindictae sequentis poena tardavit nam Psyche rursus errabundo gradu pervenit ad civitatem aliam , in qua pari modo soror morabatur alia . Nec setius et ipsa fallacie germanitatis inducta , et in sororis sceleratas nuptias aemula , festinavit ad scopulum inque simile mortis exitium cecidit .
But Psyche , though she lay bowed to the earth ,
followed her husband ' s flight as far as sight could
reach , and tormented her soul with lamentation . But
when the oarage of his wings had borne him far , and
the depth of air had snatched him from her sight , she
flung herself headlong from the brink of a river that
flowed hard by . But the kindly stream feared for
himself , and , to do honour to the god who kindles even
waters with his fire , straightway caught her in his
current and laid her unhurt upon a bank deep in flower-
ing herbage . It chanced that at that moment Pan , the
god of the country-side , sat on the river ' s brow with
Echo , the mountain-goddess , in his arms , teaching her
to make melodious answer to sounds of every kind .
Close by along the bank goats wandered as they
browsed , and wantoned as they plucked the river ' s
leafage . The goat-footed god called Psyche to him
gently , for she was bruised and swooning , and he
knew moreover what had befallen her ; and thus he
assuaged her pain with these gentle words :
" Fair maiden , I am but a rude rustic shepherd , but
long old age and ripe experience have taught me much .
Nay , if I guess aright ( though men that are wise call it
no guess , but rather divination ) , thy weak and tottering
steps , thy body ' s exceeding pallor , and thy unceasing
sighs , aye , and still more thy mournful eyes , tell me
that thou faintest beneath excess of love . Wherefore
give ear to me and seek no more to slay thyself by
casting thyself headlong down , nor by any manner of
self-slaughter . Cease from thy grief and lay aside thy
sorrow , and rather address Cupid , the mightiest of gods ,
with fervent prayer and win him to thee by tender
submission , for he is an amorous and soft-hearted
youth . " So spake the shepherd god .

Psyche made no answer , but worshipped the deity that had showed her
the path of safety and went upon her way . But when
she had wandered no small way with weary feet , about
close of day she came by a path she knew not to a certain
town , where the husband of one of her sisters held
sway . When she learned this , Psyche begged that
her presence might be announced to her sister . She
was led into the palace and there when they had made
an end of greeting and embracing one another , her
sister asked her the reason of her coming . Psyche
made answer thus : " Thou rememberest the counsel
thou didst give me , when thou didst urge me to take
a two-edged razor and slay the wild beast that lay with
me under the false name of husband , before my
wretched body fell a victim to his voracious maw .
But as soon as I took the lamp for my witness for
such , alas ! was thy counsel and looked upon his face ,
I saw a wondrous , nay , a celestial sight , even the son
of Venus , even Cupid himself , lying hushed in gentle
slumber . Transported by the sight of so much joy , and distraught by my exceeding gladness , my ecstasy
was almost more than I could endure . But at that
moment , by a cruel stroke of chance , the lamp spurted
forth a drop of burning oil , which fell upon his
shoulder . The pain wakened him forthwith from
sleep , he saw me armed with fire and blade of steel and
cried , ' In atonement for the foul crime thou hast
purposed , begone from my couch and take with thee
what is thine . I will marry thy sister ' and he
mentioned thy name ' with all due ritual . ' So saying ,
he bade the West-wind blow me beyond the confines of
the house . "

Psyche had scarcely finished when her sister , goaded
by the stings of mad lust and guilty envy , tricked her
husband with a cunningly contrived lie , pretending that
she had just received the news of her parents ' death ,
and without more ado took ship and went to that same
crag . And there , though it was no wind of the west
that blew , yet , aflame with all the greed of blind hope ,
she cried , " Take me , Cupid , a wife that is worthy
thee , and thou , wind of the west , bear up thy mistress . "
So saying , she hurled herself headlong in one mighty
leap . But not even in death might she reach that happy
place . For her limbs were tossed from rock to rock
among the crags and torn asunder , and afterwards , as
she deserved , she provided food for the birds and beasts
who devoured her entrails . Such was the manner of
her end . Nor was the doom of Cupid ' s second vengeance long
delayed . For Psyche once more was led by her wander- ing feet to another city , where the other sister dwelt , as
had dwelt the first . And even as the first , she too was
ensnared by Psyche ' s guile and , seeking in wicked
rivalry to supplant her sister as the bride of Love ,
hastened to the crag , and perished by the same death .
Psyche lay there , on the ground , watching her husband’s passage till he was out of sight , tormenting herself with the saddest lamentations . But once he was lost to view , sped onwards into the distance by his beating wings , she hurled herself from the margin of the nearest river . Yet the tender stream , respecting the god who can make even water burn , fearing for its own flow , quickly clasped her in its innocuous current and placed her on the soft turf of its flowery bank . By chance , Pan , god of the wild , was seated on the shore , caressing Echo the mountain goddess , teaching her to repeat tunes in a thousand modes . By the river’s edge , wandering she-goats grazed and frolicked , cropping the flowing grasses . The goat-legged god , catching sight of the sad and weary Psyche , and not unconscious of her plight , called to her gently and calmed her with soothing words . " Sweet lady , though I’m only a rustic herdsman , I benefit from the experience of many a long year . If I surmise rightly , though wise men call it not surmise but rather divination , by your weak and wandering footsteps , your deathly pale complexion , your constant sighs and those sad eyes , you are suffering from love’s extremes . But listen to what I say , don’t try to find death again by a suicidal leap or in some other way . Cease your mourning , end this sorrow . Rather pray to Cupid , greatest of the gods , worship him and earn his favour through blandishments and deference , for he’s a pleasure-seeking , tender-hearted youth . "

Psyche gave no reply to the shepherd god , but gave him reverence as he finished speaking , and went her way . After she’d wearily walked a good deal further , not knowing where she was , she came at twilight to a city where one of her brother-in-laws was king . Realising this , Psyche asked that her arrival be communicated to her sister . She was quickly led to her , and when they were done with embraces and greetings , her sister asked the reason for her presence . Psyche explained : " You’ll recall your counsel , when you both advised me to take a sharp razor and kill the monster that played the role of husband and slept with me , before its rapacious jaws might swallow me whole . Well , I acted on that advice , with the lamp my accomplice , but when I gazed on his face I saw an utterly wonderful , a divine sight : Venus’s child , the goddess’s son , Cupid himself I say , lying there , and sleeping peacefully . Roused by that blissful vision , disturbed by excess of joy , distressed at being unable to delight in him much longer , through dreadful mischance a drop of hot oil spurted onto his shoulder . The pain roused him from sleep and , seeing that I was armed with flame and steel , he cried : ‘For your wicked crime , you are banished from my bed , take what is yours and go . I shall embrace your sister now he spoke your name formally in holy matrimony . Then he ordered Zephyr to drive me from the palace . "

Psyche had barely finished speaking before her sister spurred on by raging passion and venomous jealousy had conceived a tale to deceive her husband . Pretending she had just had news of her parents’ deaths , she took ship , and travelled to the cliff-edge . Though an adverse wind was blowing , filled with desire and in blind hope she cried : " Accept a wife worthy of you , Cupid : carry your mistress to him , Zephyr ! And she took a headlong leap . Yet even in death she could not reach her goal . Her body was broken and torn on the jagged rocks , as she deserved , and her lacerated corpse provided a ready banquet for the wild beasts and carrion birds . Nor was the second sister’s punishment slow in arriving . Psyche wandered on to the city where her other sibling lived in similar style , who likewise roused by her sister’s story , eager to supplant her wickedly in marriage , rushed to the cliff and met the selfsame end .

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The Latin Project But It's Slowly Killing My Very Being

Carolyne ThePreposterous /
Latin
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et cum dicto reserat pyxidem : nec quicquam ibi rerum nec formositas ulla , sed infernus somnus ac vere Stygius , qui statim coperculo revelatus invadit eam crassaque soporis nebula cunctis eius membris perfunditur et in ipso vestigio ipsaque semita coli lapsam possidet ; et iacebat immobilis et nihil aliud quam dormiens cadaver . Sed Cupido iam cicatrice solida revalescens nec diutinam suae Psyches absentiam tolerans , per altissimam cubiculi , quo cohibebatur , elapsus fenestram , refectisque pinnis aliquanta quiete , longe velocius provolans Psychen accurrit suam , detersoque somno curiose et rursum in pristinam pyxidis sedem recondito , Psychen innoxio punctulo sagittae suae suscitat , et ‘Ecce’ inquit ‘Rursum perieras , misella , simili curiositate . Sed interim quidem tu provinciam , quae tibi matris meae praecepto mandata est , exsequere naviter ; cetera egomet videro . His dictis amator levis in pinnas se dedit , Psyche vero confestim Veneri munus reportat Proserpinae .
Interea Cupido , amore nimio peresus et aegra facie , matris suae repentinam sobrietatem pertimescens ad armillum redit alisque pernicibus caeli penetrato vertice magno Iovi supplicat suamque causam probat . Tunc Iuppiter prehensa Cupidinis buccula manuque ad os suum relata consaviat , atque sic ad illum ‘Licet tu’ inquit Domine fili , nunquam mihi concessu deum decretum servaris honorem , sed istud pectus meum , quo leges elementorum et vices siderum disponuntur , convulneraris assiduis ictibus crebrisque terrenae libidinis foedaveris casibus , contraque leges et ipsam Iuliam disciplinamque publicam turpibus adulteriis existimationem famamque meam laeseris , in serpentes , in ignes , in feras , in aves et gregalia pecua serenos vultus meos sordide reformando ; at tamen modestiae meae memor quodque inter istas meas manus creveris , cuncta perficiam , dum tamen scias aemulos tuos cavere ac , si qua nunc in terris puella praepollet pulchritudine , praesentis beneficii vicem per eam mihi repensare te debere .
Sic fatus iubet Mercurium deos omnes ad contionem protinus convocare ac si qui coetu caelestium I defuisset , in poenam decem milium nummum conventum iri pronuntiare . Quo metu statim completo [ p . 282 ] caelesti theatro , pro sede sublimi sedens procerus Iuppiter sic enuntiat : ‘Dei conscripti Musarum albo , adulescentem istum quod manibus meis alumnatus sim , profecto scitis omnes , cuius primae iuventutis caloratos impetus freno quodam coercendos existimavi . Sat est cotidianis eum fabulis ob adulteria cunctasque corruptelas infamatum : tollenda est omnis occasio et luxuria puerilis nuptialibus pedicis alliganda . Puellam elegit et virginitate privavit : teneat , possideat , amplexus Psychen semper suis amoribus perfruatur’ : et ad Venerem collata facie , ‘Nec tu , inquit ‘Filia , quicquam contristere nec prosapiae tantae tuae statuque de matrimonio mortali metuas . Iam faxo nuptias non impares sed legitimas et iure civili congruas , en illico per Mercurium arripi Psychen et in caelum perduci iubet . Porrecto ambrosiae poculo , Sume , inquit Psyche , et immortalis esto ; nec unquam digredietur a tuo nexu Cupido sed istae vobis erunt perpetuae nuptiae .
Nec mora , cum cena nuptialis affluens exhibetur : accumbebat summum torum maritus , Psychen gremia suo complexus ; sic et cum sua Iunone Iuppiter ac deinde per ordinem toti dei . Tunc poculum nectaris , quod vinum deorum est , Iovi quidem suus pocillator , ille rusticus puer , ceteris vero Liber ministrabat , Vulcanus cenam coquebat , Horae rosis et ceteris floribus purpurabant omnia , Gratiae [ p . 284 ] spargebant balsama , Musae quoque canora personabant , Apollo cantavit ad citharam , Venus suavi musicae superingressa formosa saltavit : scaena sibi sic concinnata , ut Musae quidem chorum canerent et tibias inflarent , Satyrus et Paniscus ad fistulam dicerent . Sic rite Psyche convenit in manum Cupidinis , et nascitur illis maturo partu filia , quam Voluptatem nominamus .
And with those words she unsealed the jar ; but there was never a drop of beauty there , nothing but deathly , truly Stygian sleep . When the cover was lifted slumber attacked her instantly , enveloping her entire body in a dense cloud of somnolence . She collapsed where she stood , fell on the path , and deep slumber overcame her . She lay there motionless , like a corpse but fast asleep . Cupid , feeling better now that his scar had healed , could no longer endure the absence of his beloved Psyche and , dropped from the high window of the room where he’d been confined . With wings restored by his long rest , he flew all the more swiftly , and swooping to Psyche’s side he wiped away the sleep with care and returned it to the jar where it belonged . Then he roused her with a harmless touch of his arrow , saying : " Look how you’ve nearly ruined yourself again , poor child , with that insatiable curiosity of yours . Now be quick and finish the task my mother assigned . I’ll take care of everything else . " With this he took lightly to his wings , while Psyche , for her part , swiftly carried Proserpine’s gift to Venus .
Now Cupid , pale of face , devoured by uncontrollable love , was so concerned by his mother’s sudden harshness he returned to his old tricks , quickly flying to heaven’s heights on his swift wings , kneeling before great Jove , and attempting to win support for his cause . Jupiter tweaked Cupid’s cheek , raised the lad’s hand to his lips , kissed it and replied . " My dear son , despite the fact you’ve never shown the slightest respect granted me by all other deities , but wounded my heart again and again , and shamed me with endless bouts of earthly passion , I , who command the elements , I , who ordain the course of the stars ; and despite the fact you defy the law , even the Lex Julia itself , and the rules that maintain public order ; that you’ve injured my good name , and destroyed my reputation through scandalous adulteries , transforming my tranquil features vilely into snakes and flames , and birds and beasts , and even cattle ; nevertheless , because of my sweet disposition , and the fact that you were cradled in my own arms , I’ll do as you ask . But only on one condition ; that you beware of making me your rival by giving me , in payment for this favour , some other girl of outstanding beauty . "
So saying , he ordered Mercury to call an impromptu gathering of the gods , with a fine of a hundred pieces of gold for failing to attend the heavenly assembly , which threat guaranteed the celestial theatre was filled . Almighty Jupiter , from his high throne , gave the following address : " O deities , inscribed in the roll-call of the Muses , you all know it to be true that I raised this lad with my own hands . I’ve decided the impulses of his hot youth need curbing in some manner . We must take away the opportunity ; restrain his childish indulgence with the bonds of matrimony . He’s found a girl , he’s taken her virginity . Let him have her , hold her , and in Psyche’s arms indulge his passions forever . " Then he turned to Venus saying : " Now my daughter , don’t be despondent . Don’t fear for your lineage or status , because of his wedding a mortal . I’ll make it a marriage of equals , legitimate , in accord with civil law . " And he ordered Mercury to bring Psyche to heaven at once . Once there he handed her a cup of ambrosia , saying : " Drink this Psyche , and be immortal . Cupid will never renege on the bond , and the marriage will last forever . "
Presently a rich wedding feast appeared . The bridegroom reclined at the head , clasping Psyche in his arms . Jupiter and Juno sat beside them , and all the deities in order . Ganymede , the cup-bearing shepherd lad , served Jupiter his nectar , that wine of the gods , and Bacchus-Liber served all the rest , while Vulcan cooked the meal . Now the Hours adorned everyone with roses and hosts of other flowers ; the Graces scattered balsam ; the choir of the Muses sounded ; Apollo sang to the lyre , and Venus danced charmingly to that outpouring of sweet music , arranging the scene so the Muses chimed together , with a Satyr fluting away , and a woodland creature of Pan’s piping his reeds . So Psyche was given in marriage to Cupid according to the rite , and when her term was due a daughter was born to them both , whom we call Pleasure .
So saying she opened the box . But she found nothing whatever in it , no beauty , but only an infernal sleep , a sleep truly Stygian , which when the lid was taken off and it was let out at once took possession of her and diffused itself in a black cloud of oblivion throughout her whole body , so that overcome by it she collapsed on the spot where she stood in the pathway , and lay motionless , a mere sleeping corpse . But Cupid’s wound had now healed and , his strength returned , he could no longer bear to be parted for so long from Psyche . He escaped from the high window of the room in which he was confined ; and , with his wings restored by his long rest , he flew off at great speed to the side of his Psyche . Carefully wiping off the sleep and replacing it where it had been in the box , he roused her with a harmless prick from one of his arrows . ‘There , poor wretch , he said , ‘you see how yet again curiosity has been your undoing . But meanwhile you must complete the mission assigned you by my mother with all diligence ; the rest I will see to . So saying , her lover nimbly took flight , while Psyche quickly took back Proserpine’s gift to Venus .
Meanwhile Cupid , eaten up with love , looking ill , and dreading his mother’s new-found austerity , became himself again . On swift wings he made his way to the very summit of heaven and pleaded his cause as a suppliant with great Jupiter . Jupiter took Cupid’s face in his hand , pulled it to his own , and kissed him , saying : ‘In spite of the fact , dear boy , that you have never paid me the respect decreed me by the gods in council , but have constantly shot and wounded this breast of mine by which the behaviour of the elements and the movements of the heavenly bodies are regulated , defiling it repeatedly with lustful adventures on earth , compromising my reputation and character by low intrigues in defiance of the laws , the Lex Julia included , and of public morals , changing my majestic features into the base shapes of snakes , of fire , of wild animals , of birds and of farmyard beasts yet in spite of all , remembering my clemency and that you grew up in my care , I will do what you ask . But you must take care to guard against your rivals ; and if there is now any pre-eminently lovely girl on earth , you are bound to pay me back with her for this good turn .
So saying , he ordered Mercury to summon all the gods immediately to assembly , proclaiming that any absentees from this heavenly meeting would be liable to a fine of ten thousand sesterces . This threat at once filled the divine theatre ; and Jupiter , towering on his lofty throne , announced his decision . ‘Conscript deities enrolled in the register of the Muses , you undoubtedly know this young man well , and how I have reared him with my own hands . I have decided that the hot-blooded impulses of his first youth must somehow be bridled ; his name has been besmirched long enough in common report by adultery and all kinds of licentious behaviour . We must take away all opportunity for this and confine his youthful excess in the bonds of marriage . He has chosen a girl and had her virginity : let him have and hold her , and embracing Psyche for ever enjoy his beloved . Then turning to Venus , ‘Daughter , he said , ‘do not be downcast or fear for your great lineage or social standing because of this marriage with a mortal . I shall arrange for it to be not unequal but legitimate and in accordance with the civil law . Then he ordered Psyche to be brought by Mercury and introduced into heaven . Handing her a cup of ambrosia , ‘Take this , Psyche , he said , ‘and be immortal . Never shall Cupid quit the tie that binds you , but this marriage shall be perpetual for you both .
No sooner said than done : a lavish wedding-feast appeared . In the place of honour reclined Psyche’s husband , with his wife in his arms , and likewise Jupiter with his Juno , and then the other gods in order of precedence . Cups of nectar were served to Jove by his own cupbearer , the shepherd lad , and to the others by Liber ; Vulcan cooked the dinner ; the Seasons made everything colourful with roses and other flowers ; the Graces sprinkled perfumes ; the Muses discoursed tuneful music . Then Apollo sang to the lyre , and Venus , fitting her steps to the sweet music , danced in all her beauty , having arranged a production in which the Muses were chorus and played the tibia , while a Satyr and a little Pan sang to the shepherd’s pipe . Thus was Psyche married to Cupid with all proper ceremony , and when her time came there was born to them a daughter , whom we call Pleasure .

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Metamorphosis Project 1

Sage Rieth /
  • Created on 2018-10-11 18:58:51
  • Modified on 2018-10-15 03:48:02
  • Translated by B. Earl and H.E. Butler
  • Aligned by Sage Rieth
Latin
English
English
[ 2 ] Thessaliam - nam et illic originis maternae nostrae fundamenta a Plutarcho illo inclito ac mox Sexto philosopho nepote eius prodita gloriam nobis faciunt - eam Thessaliam ex negotio petebam . Postquam ardua montium ac lubrica vallium et roscida cespitum et glebosa camporum emersi , in equo indigena peralbo vehens iam eo quoque admodum fesso , ut ipse etiam fatigationem sedentariam incessus vegetatione discuterem in pedes desilio , equi sudorem frontem curiose exfrico , auris remulceo , frenos detraho , in gradum lenem sensim proveho , quoad lassitudinis incommodum alvi solitum ac naturale praesidium eliquaret . Ac dum is ientaculum ambulatorium prata quae praeterit ore in latus detorto pronus adfectat , duobus comitum qui forte paululum processerant tertium me facio . Ac dum ausculto quid sermonibus agitarent , alter exserto cachinno : " Parce " inquit " in verba ista haec tam absurda tamque immania mentiendo . " Isto accepto sititor alioquin novitatis : " Immo vero " inquam " impertite sermonem non quidem curiosum sed qui velim scire vel cuncta vel certe plurima ; simul iugi quod insurgimus aspritudinem fabularum lepida iucunditas levigabit . "
[ 3 ] At ille qui coeperat : " Ne " inquit " istud mendacium tam verum est quam siqui velit dicere magico susurramine amnes agiles reverti , mare pigrum conligari , ventos inanimes exspirare , solem inhiberi , lunam despumari , stellas evelli , diem tolli , noctem teneri . " Tunc ego in verba fidentior : " Heus tu " inquam " qui sermonem ieceras priorem , ne pigeat te vel taedeat reliqua pertexere " , et ad alium : " Tu vero crassis auribus et obstinato corde respuis quae forsitan vere perhibeantur . Minus hercule calles pravissimis opinionibus ea putari mendacia quae vel auditu nova vel visu rudia vel certe supra captum cogitationis ardua videantur ; quae si paulo accuratius exploraris , non modo compertu evidentia verum etiam factu facilia senties .
[ 4 ] Ego denique vespera , dum polentae caseatae modico secus offulam grandiorem in convivas aemulus contruncare gestio , mollitie cibi glutinosi faucibus inhaerentis et meacula spiritus distinentis minimo minus interii . Et tamen Athenis proxime et ante Poecilen porticum isto gemino obtutu circulatorem aspexi equestrem spatham praeacutam mucrone infesto devorasse , ac mox eundem , invitamento exiguae stipis venatoriam lanceam , qua parte minatur exitium , in ima viscera condidisse . Et ecce pone lanceae ferrum , qua bacillum inversi teli ad occipitium per ingluviem subit , puer in mollitiem decorus insurgit inque flexibus tortuosis enervam et exossam saltationem explicat cum omnium qui aderamus admiratione : diceres dei medici baculo , quod ramis semiamputatis nodosum gerit , serpentem generosum lubricis amplexibus inhaerere . Sed iam cedo tu sodes , qui coeperas , fabulam remetire . Ego tibi solus haec pro isto credam , et quod ingressui primum fuerit stabulum prandio participabo . Haec tibi merces posita est . "
1 . 2
I was going to Thessaly-my mother is from Thessaly , by the way , and she ' s descended
from Plutarch , you know , the famous biographer , and not to mention his grandson , the philosopher Sextus of Chaeronea , and they made our family famous-anyways , I was on my way to Thessaly for a business trip . I surpassed the heights of the mountains , the crumbling paths of the valleys , the dewy parts of the pastures , and the clumpy furrows of the fields , riding on my native , pure-white horse . We were both exhausted , my horse and I , he from the journey and me from sitting ; so , now that we had passed through the thick vegetation , I jumped down to shake off my weariness . I carefully wiped my horse ' s sweaty forehead , stroked his ears , took off his bridle , and slowly led him at a gentle pace , until nature could restore his weary troubles and his empty belly , as it usually did . Meanwhile , he found his breakfast while we walked , leaning toward the fields we passed with his mouth turned to the side . By chance , we found ourselves walking a little ways near two companions , and I joined their little group . I listened to the conversation they were having , and one of the men , erupting with a deep guffaw , said , " That ' s enough already , what you ' re telling me is absurd , nothing but enormous lies . " Since I ' m always thirsting for such a tale-or really , for any peculiarity-I said , " Oh , come now , tell me your story . It ' s not that I ' m prying , but I ' m just the kind of guy who wants to know everything , or at least as much as I can . Not to mention , a delightful anecdote will ease our difficult climb up this big hill we ' re coming to . "

1 . 3
But the man who spoke first said , " If you told me that a whispered spell could make the swiftest rivers flow backwards , turn the sea into something too lazy to swell , force the winds to breathe out their last breath , stop the sun right in its tracks , wipe the shine off of the moon , pluck out the stars from the sky , kidnap the day , and stretch out the night-if you told me all that , I ' d believe it exactly as much as I believe those lies of yours . " More confident than before , I spoke up again . " Hey , you , " I said , pointing to the one who had already begun his story . " Don ' t get fed up or bored , finish it for me . " To the doubter , I said , " As for you , your ears are filled with mud . It ' s with a stubborn heart that you reject what very well could be true . By Hercules , you ' re not that bright to have these depraved opinions , thinking everything is a lie , even if the things sound strange to your ears , look like a heap of codswallop , or seem too lofty to grasp . If you would just look a little more carefully , you would see for yourself that not only are such things easy to find , they are even easy to do . "

1 . 4
I continued , " In fact , just last night , I was eating dinner with some co-banqueters , my gastronomic rivals . I was eager to gobble up a sort-of-largish chunk of cheesy porridge , and when the soft and sticky food stuck to my jaws and throat , I couldn ' t breathe-I nearly died . But this is nothing compared to what I saw swallowed on my recent trip to Athens . I was visiting the Poecilen colonnade , you know , outside the famous picture gallery in the market where Zeno liked to meet . I saw with my own two eyes a traveling performer swallow a very sharp broadsword , the kind cavalry would carry , tip-first ! Then , spurred onward by a small coin , the very same man swallowed a hunting spear by the end which threatened to be his ruin , burying it deep in his belly . And , right there in front of me , on top of the lance ' s hilt , where the handle of the upside-down weapon rose up through his mouth and out the back of his head , a boy ( who was quite the little princess ) climbed up and , twisting and turning , began to dance , contorting like he had no bones . Everyone there was dumbstruck . You would have said he was the noble serpent that winds itself in a slippery embrace around the staff borne by the medicine god , knotted with many half-pruned twigs . But now , if you don ' t mind , " I finished , nodding to the one who needed to finish his tale , " get on with it . Recount your story , and I alone will believe you , even if that man won ' t . And at the first tavern we come to , I ' ll buy you dinner . That ' ll be the return on your investment . "
1 . 2
I was going to Thessaly , -for my mother ' s family is sprung from that country and I am proud to say can count among its members the famous Plutarch and later his nephew , the philosopher Sextus . Well then , I was going to Thessaly on business . I had passed and left behind me steep mountain passes and slippery valley paths , dewy greensward and rich loam of plough lands , and the Thessalian horse that carried me , a beast of spotless whiteness , was exceeding weary . I too was tired of long sitting in the saddle and longed to dispel my fatigue by a brisk walk . So I leapt to the ground , carefully wiped away the sweat from my horse ' s fore- head , stroked his ears , loosened the reins , and gradually urged him to a gentle walk , until such time as nature should bring its wonted relief and remove the burden of his weariness . With head stooped to earth he broke his fast as he walked and with sidelong sweep of his mouth browsed on the fields through which he passed , while I rejoined my two comrades who had forged somewhat ahead of us . As I listened to hear of what they might be talking , one of them laughed loud and said , ' Nay ! spare us such monstrous and absurd fabrications ! ' I am always athirst for novelties , and when I heard this , I cried , ' Come now , you must admit me to your conversation . It is no mere curiosity that prompts me to make such a request , but the desire to make my knowledge complete , or at any rate as complete as may be . Besides , the charm and wit of your stories will smoothe away the difficulties of this hill we ' re climbing . '

1 . 3
Then he who had first spoken said to the other , ' Call it a lie if you will , but in good truth it is no more a lie than it would be to say that magic chants have power to make rushing rivers flow backwards , to bind the sea in sluggish calm , put breath in lifeless bodies , stay the sun in his course , draw foam from the moon , tear the stars from their places , banish the day and hold fast the darkness of night . ' This encouraged me to press my suit , and I said to him , ' Please finish the story you had begun ; do not grudge it me . There ' s no cause for reluctance . ' Then turning to the other , ' As for you , ' said I , ' you , with your dull ears and obstinate scepticism , are rejecting what may perhaps turn out to be true after all . Good heavens ! you don ' t seem to realize that it ' s mere perversity makes men think that things must needs be false because they seem strange to the hearing or new to the eyes , or at any rate far removed beyond the range of imagination . If you will only look into them a little more carefully , it ' s likely enough that you will find them not only obvious to the understanding but even easy to perform . Take an example

1 . 4
One 4 evening in the attempt to keep pace with my companions at table I hurried a little too much . I attempted to gulp down a rather large mouthful of pearl-barley flavoured with cheese and came within a hair ' s-breadth of death ; for the food , being soft and sticky , became lodged in my throat and obstructed the channels of my breath . And yet , only the other day , at Athens in front of the Painted Porch with these two eyes of mine I saw a mountebank on horseback swallow a sharp sword point foremost , and again , for the offer of a few pence , thrust a hunting-spear , its death-dealing point downwards , right into his very vitals ! And , look you , above the lance-head , where the shaft of the inverted lance rose from his open jaws toward his crown , there stood up a pretty girlish-looking boy who danced so nimbly with many a tortuous bending of his body that he seemed to have neither bone nor muscle . All we who stood by marvelled . You might have likened him to some splendid snake twining with slippery coils about the staff that the god of healing bears , all rough with knots where the twigs have been lopped away . But now come , I beg you , begin once more the story you had set forth to tell . If our friend here won ' t believe it , I will , and at the first inn we come to you shall lunch with me . That shall be your payment for the story . You have my word for it . '

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Metamorpheses, 3.9-3.11

Jordan Triplet /
  • Created on 2018-10-02 00:26:29
  • Modified on 2018-11-09 00:42:43
  • Aligned by Jordan Triplet
Latin
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English
His dictis applauditur , et illico me magistratus ipsum iubet corpora , quae lectulo fuerant posita , mea manu detegere . Luctantem me ac diu renuentem praecedens facinus instaurare nova ostensione lictores iussu magistratuum quam instantissime compellunt manum denique ipsam e regione lateris fundentes in exitium suum super ipsa cadavera porrigunt . Evictus tandem necessitate succumbo , et ingratis licet arrepta pallio retexi corpora . Di boni , quae facies rei ! Quod monstrum ! Quae fortunarum mearum repentina ! mutatio ! Quamquam enim iam in peculio Proserpinae et Orci familia numeratus , subito in contrariam faciem obstupefactus haesi nec possum novae illius imaginis rationem idoneis verbis expedire : nam cadavera illa iugulatorum hominum erant tres utres inflati variisque secti foraminibus et , ut vespertinum proelium meum recordabar , his locis hiantes , quibus latrones illos vulneraveram .

Tunc ille quorundam astu paulisper cohibitus risus libere iam exarsit in plebem : hi gaudii nimietate gratulari , illi dolorem ventris manuum compressione sedare , et certe laetitia delibuti meque respectantes cuncti theatro facessunt . At ego , ut primum illam laciniam prenderam , fixus in lapidem steti gelidus , nihil secus quam una de ceteris theatri statuis vel columnis : nec prius ab inferis emersi quam Milo hospes accessit et iniecta manu me renitentem lacrimisque [ p . 116 ] rursum promicantibus crebra singultientem clementi violentia secum attraxit et observatis viae solitudinibus per quosdam anfractus domum suam perduxit , maestumque me atque etiam tunc trepidum variis solatur affatibus ; nec tamen indignationem iniuriae , ) quae inhaeserat altius meo pectori , ullo modo permulcere quivit .

Ecce illico etiam ipsi magistratus cum suis insignibus domum nostram ingressi talibus me monitis delenire gestiunt : Neque tuae dignitatis vel etiam prosapiae tuorum ignari sumus , Luci domine ; nam et provinciam totam inclitae vestrae familiae nobilitas complectitur . Ac ne istud quod vehementer ingemescis contumeliae causa perpessus es : omnem itaque de tuo pectore praesentem tristitudinem mitte , et angorem animi depelle , nam lusus iste quem publice gratissimo deo Risui per annua reverticula sollemniter celebramus , semper commenti novitate florescit : iste deus et auctorem suum propitius ubique comitabitur amanter neci unquam patietur ut ex animo doleas , sed frontem tuam serena venustate lactabit assidue . At tibi civitas omnis pro ista gratia honores egregios obtulit a nam et patronum scripsit et ut in aere stet imago tua decrevit . Ad haec dicta sermonis vicem refero a ‘Tibi quidem’ inquam Splendidissima et unica Thessaliae civitas , honorum talium parem gratiam memini . Verum statuas et imagines dignioribus
Her speech met with applause , and the magistrate ordered me to uncover the bodies on the bier with my own hands . Resisting for some time I refused to add to my earlier deed with this new exposure . But the lictors , at the magistrates’ orders , forced me to comply . Finally they dragged my hand from my side and stretched it over the corpses to my own destruction . Succumbing at last to necessity , I yielded though unwillingly , and snatching away the pall revealed the bodies .
Oh gods , what sight was this ! How extraordinary ! What a sudden transformation of my fate ! Though I’d been counting myself already among Proserpina’s crew , enrolled as a member of the house of Orcus , appearances were instantly altered , and there I stood , dumbfounded . How can I find the words to give a rational account of that sight ? You see , the corpses of the murdered men were three swollen wine-skins pierced with sundry holes , and recalling my struggles of the night before I saw they were in the very places where I’d stabbed the thieves .
Then the laughter which the crowd had been cunningly repressing broke out without restraint everywhere . Some were cackling in a sheer excess of mirth , others pressed their fists to their stomachs to relieve the ache . At any event they were all drowned in delight , and kept turning to look at me again as they exited the theatre . As for me , from the moment I’d pulled the cloth back , I’d been standing there frozen , transformed to stone , just like one of the theatre’s columns or statues . Nor did I rise from the dead till Milo my host came and grasped me , I resisting , while tears flew once more and I kept sobbing . He urged me gently along and led me to his house by a winding route , careful to avoid the busy streets . I was still in a state of shock , and trembling with fear , and he could find no way to ease the indignation , at the treatment I’d endured , constricting my heart .
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Behold , clad in the full regalia of office , the magistrates themselves entered the house , and tried to calm me with these words : ‘Master Lucius , we’re not unaware of your dignity , and your ancestry . Indeed the whole province knows your family’s noble reputation . The experience you’ve undergone , that you’re grieving over so deeply , was far from being intended as an insult . So banish the melancholy you feel , from your heart , and overcome your