Odyssey 8.499-531 Translation Comparison

Henry Hintermeister / Odyssey, Homer
  • Created on 2019-04-07 19:43:46
  • Modified on 2019-04-08 01:44:57
  • Translated by Robert Fagles, Henry Hintermeister
  • Aligned by Henry Hintermeister
English
Ἑλληνική
English
Stirred now by the Muse , the bard launched out
in a fine blaze of song , starting at just the point
where the main Achaean force , setting their camps afire ,
had boarded the oarswept ships and sailed for home
but famed Odysseus’ men already crouched and hiding‒
in the heart of Troy’s assembly‒ dark in that horse
the Trojans dragged themselves to the city heights .
Now it stood there , looming…
and round its bulk the Trojans sat debating ,
clashing , days on end , three plans split their ranks :
either to hack open the hollow vault with ruthless bronze
or haul it up to the highest ridge and pitch it down the cliffs
or let it stand‒ a glorious offering made to pacify the gods‒
and that , that final plan , was bound to win the day .
For Troy was fated to perish once the city lodged
inside her walls the monstrous wooden horse
where the prime of Argive power lay in wait
with death and slaughter bearing down on Troy .
And he sang how troops of Achaeans broke from cover ,
streaming out from the horse’s hollow flanks to plunder Troy‒
he sang how left and right they ravaged the steep city ,
sang how Odysseus marched right up to Deiphobus’ house
like the god of war on attack with diehard Menelaus .
There , he sang , Odysseus fought the grimmest fight
he had ever braved but he won through at last ,
thanks to Athena’s superhuman power .

That was the song the famous harper sang
but great Odysseus melted into tears ,
running down from his eyes to wet his cheeks…
as a woman weeps , her arms flung round her darling husband ,
a man who fell in battle , fighting for town and townsmen ,
trying to beat the day of doom from home and children .
Seeing the man go down , dying , gasping for breath ,
she clings for dear life , screams and shrills‒
but the victors , just behind her ,
digging spear buts into her back and shoulders ,
drag her off in bondage , yoked to hard labor , pain ,
and the most heartbreaking torment wastes her cheeks .
So from Odysseus’ eyes ran tears of heartbreak now .
ὣς φάθʼ , δʼ ὁρμηθεὶς θεοῦ ἤρχετο , φαῖνε δʼ ἀοιδήν ,
ἔνθεν ἑλὼν ὡς οἱ μὲν ἐυσσέλμων ἐπὶ νηῶν
βάντες ἀπέπλειον , πῦρ ἐν κλισίῃσι βαλόντες ,
Ἀργεῖοι , τοὶ δʼ ἤδη ἀγακλυτὸν ἀμφʼ Ὀδυσῆα
ἥατʼ ἐνὶ Τρώων ἀγορῇ κεκαλυμμένοι ἵππῳ ·
αὐτοὶ γάρ μιν Τρῶες ἐς ἀκρόπολιν ἐρύσαντο .
ὣς μὲν ἑστήκει , τοὶ δʼ ἄκριτα πόλλʼ ἀγόρευον
ἥμενοι ἀμφʼ αὐτόν · τρίχα δέ σφισιν ἥνδανε βουλή ,
ἠὲ διαπλῆξαι κοῖλον δόρυ νηλέι χαλκῷ ,
κατὰ πετράων βαλέειν ἐρύσαντας ἐπʼ ἄκρης ,
ἐάαν μέγʼ ἄγαλμα θεῶν θελκτήριον εἶναι ,
τῇ περ δὴ καὶ ἔπειτα τελευτήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν ·
αἶσα γὰρ ἦν ἀπολέσθαι , ἐπὴν πόλις ἀμφικαλύψῃ
δουράτεον μέγαν ἵππον , ὅθʼ ἥατο πάντες ἄριστοι
Ἀργείων Τρώεσσι φόνον καὶ κῆρα φέροντες .
ἤειδεν δʼ ὡς ἄστυ διέπραθον υἷες Ἀχαιῶν
ἱππόθεν ἐκχύμενοι , κοῖλον λόχον ἐκπρολιπόντες .
ἄλλον δʼ ἄλλῃ ἄειδε πόλιν κεραϊζέμεν αἰπήν ,
αὐτὰρ Ὀδυσσῆα προτὶ δώματα Δηιφόβοιο
βήμεναι , ἠύτʼ Ἄρηα σὺν ἀντιθέῳ Μενελάῳ .
κεῖθι δὴ αἰνότατον πόλεμον φάτο τολμήσαντα
νικῆσαι καὶ ἔπειτα διὰ μεγάθυμον Ἀθήνην .
ταῦτʼ ἄρʼ ἀοιδὸς ἄειδε περικλυτός · αὐτὰρ Ὀδυσσεὺς
τήκετο , δάκρυ δʼ ἔδευεν ὑπὸ βλεφάροισι παρειάς .
ὡς δὲ γυνὴ κλαίῃσι φίλον πόσιν ἀμφιπεσοῦσα ,
ὅς τε ἑῆς πρόσθεν πόλιος λαῶν τε πέσῃσιν ,
ἄστεϊ καὶ τεκέεσσιν ἀμύνων νηλεὲς ἦμαρ ·
μὲν τὸν θνήσκοντα καὶ ἀσπαίροντα ἰδοῦσα
ἀμφʼ αὐτῷ χυμένη λίγα κωκύει · οἱ δέ τʼ ὄπισθε
κόπτοντες δούρεσσι μετάφρενον ἠδὲ καὶ ὤμους
εἴρερον εἰσανάγουσι , πόνον τʼ ἐχέμεν καὶ ὀιζύν ·
τῆς δʼ ἐλεεινοτάτῳ ἄχεϊ φθινύθουσι παρειαί ·
ὣς Ὀδυσεὺς ἐλεεινὸν ὑπʼ ὀφρύσι δάκρυον εἶβεν .
Thus he spoke , and the man urged on by a god was beginning , and was making a song appear ,
from that point choosing how the men , stepping aboard ships with sturdy banks of oars
were sailing off , having thrown fire into the huts ,
the Argives , and verily they were already sitting around renowned Odysseus in the assembly of Troy after concealing themselves within the horse .
For the Trojans themselves dragged it into the citadel .
Thus it had stood , while they indeed were making many confused speeches ,
sitting around this thing . The council satisfied them with three plans :
either to cleave asunder the hollow wood with pitless bronze ,
or to toss the thing down from cliffs after dragging it onto a headland ,
or to permit that the great thing be a soothing gift for the gods ,
and so for this plan it was destined at all events that they would then see it through .
For it was appointed that they destroy themselves , after the city should receive
the great wooden horse , when all the best
of the Argives were sitting within , bearing murder and ruin for the Trojans .
As he sang , the sons of the Achaeans laid waste to the city ,
pouring forth from the horse , after forsaking the hollow ambuscade .
He was singing that one for another they ravaged the lofty city ,
yet Odysseus strode towards the house of Deiphobus ,
like Ares together with godlike Menelaus .
He was saying that after enduring his grimmest fight
he saw victory through great-hearted Athena .
There and then the renowned bard was singing about these things . Yet Odysseus
was melting and his tears were drenching the cheeks beneath his eyelids .
As a woman weeps , embracing her dear husband ,
who fell before both his city and his people ,
warding off the ruthless day for his city and his children .
Seeing him dying and gasping for breath ,
she lets out a piercing shriek , pouring tears all around him . And the soldiers ,
striking her from behind on her back and shoulders with spears
lead her into slavery , to have toil and misery .
Her cheeks waste away with the most pitiable wretchedness .
Just so , Odysseus let fall piteous tears beneath his eyebrows .

( 68 ) 17% ENG
( 325 ) 83% ENG - GRC

( 216 ) 82% ENG - GRC
( 46 ) 18% GRC

( 216 ) 82% ENG - GRC
( 46 ) 18% GRC

Odyssey 1.1-31 Chapman

/
  • Created on 2019-04-07 00:01:35
  • Translated by George Chapman
  • Aligned by
An alignment of Chapman's translation of the Odyssey.
Ἑλληνική Transliterate
English
ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε , μοῦσα , πολύτροπον , ὃς μάλα πολλὰ
πλάγχθη , ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν :
πολλῶν δ᾽ ἀνθρώπων ἴδεν ἄστεα καὶ νόον ἔγνω ,
πολλὰ δ᾽ γ᾽ ἐν πόντῳ πάθεν ἄλγεα ὃν κατὰ θυμόν ,
ἀρνύμενος ἥν τε ψυχὴν καὶ νόστον ἑταίρων .
ἀλλ᾽ οὐδ᾽ ὣς ἑτάρους ἐρρύσατο , ἱέμενός περ :
αὐτῶν γὰρ σφετέρῃσιν ἀτασθαλίῃσιν ὄλοντο ,
νήπιοι , οἳ κατὰ βοῦς Ὑπερίονος Ἠελίοιο
ἤσθιον : αὐτὰρ τοῖσιν ἀφείλετο νόστιμον ἦμαρ .
τῶν ἁμόθεν γε , θεά , θύγατερ Διός , εἰπὲ καὶ ἡμῖν .
ἔνθ᾽ ἄλλοι μὲν πάντες , ὅσοι φύγον αἰπὺν ὄλεθρον ,
οἴκοι ἔσαν , πόλεμόν τε πεφευγότες ἠδὲ θάλασσαν :
τὸν δ᾽ οἶον νόστου κεχρημένον ἠδὲ γυναικὸς
νύμφη πότνι᾽ ἔρυκε Καλυψὼ δῖα θεάων
ἐν σπέσσι γλαφυροῖσι , λιλαιομένη πόσιν εἶναι .
ἀλλ᾽ ὅτε δὴ ἔτος ἦλθε περιπλομένων ἐνιαυτῶν ,
τῷ οἱ ἐπεκλώσαντο θεοὶ οἶκόνδε νέεσθαι
εἰς Ἰθάκην , οὐδ᾽ ἔνθα πεφυγμένος ἦεν ἀέθλων
καὶ μετὰ οἷσι φίλοισι . θεοὶ δ᾽ ἐλέαιρον ἅπαντες
νόσφι Ποσειδάωνος : δ᾽ ἀσπερχὲς μενέαινεν
ἀντιθέῳ Ὀδυσῆι πάρος ἣν γαῖαν ἱκέσθαι .
ἀλλ᾽ μὲν Αἰθίοπας μετεκίαθε τηλόθ᾽ ἐόντας ,
Αἰθίοπας τοὶ διχθὰ δεδαίαται , ἔσχατοι ἀνδρῶν ,
οἱ μὲν δυσομένου Ὑπερίονος οἱ δ᾽ ἀνιόντος ,
ἀντιόων ταύρων τε καὶ ἀρνειῶν ἑκατόμβης .
ἔνθ᾽ γ᾽ ἐτέρπετο δαιτὶ παρήμενος : οἱ δὲ δὴ ἄλλοι
Ζηνὸς ἐνὶ μεγάροισιν Ὀλυμπίου ἁθρόοι ἦσαν .
τοῖσι δὲ μύθων ἦρχε πατὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε :
μνήσατο γὰρ κατὰ θυμὸν ἀμύμονος Αἰγίσθοιο ,
τόν ῥ᾽ Ἀγαμεμνονίδης τηλεκλυτὸς ἔκταν᾽ Ὀρέστης :
τοῦ γ᾽ ἐπιμνησθεὶς ἔπε᾽ ἀθανάτοισι μετηύδα :
‘ὢ πόποι , οἷον δή νυ θεοὺς βροτοὶ αἰτιόωνται :
ἐξ ἡμέων γάρ φασι κάκ᾽ ἔμμεναι , οἱ δὲ καὶ αὐτοὶ
σφῇσιν ἀτασθαλίῃσιν ὑπὲρ μόρον ἄλγε᾽ ἔχουσιν ,
ὡς καὶ νῦν Αἴγισθος ὑπὲρ μόρον Ἀτρεΐδαο
γῆμ᾽ ἄλοχον μνηστήν , τὸν δ᾽ ἔκτανε νοστήσαντα ,
εἰδὼς αἰπὺν ὄλεθρον , ἐπεὶ πρό οἱ εἴπομεν ἡμεῖς ,
Ἑρμείαν πέμψαντες , ἐύσκοπον ἀργεϊφόντην ,
μήτ᾽ αὐτὸν κτείνειν μήτε μνάασθαι ἄκοιτιν :
ἐκ γὰρ Ὀρέσταο τίσις ἔσσεται Ἀτρεΐδαο ,
ὁππότ᾽ ἂν ἡβήσῃ τε καὶ ἧς ἱμείρεται αἴης .
ὣς ἔφαθ᾽ Ἑρμείας , ἀλλ᾽ οὐ φρένας Αἰγίσθοιο
πεῖθ᾽ ἀγαθὰ φρονέων : νῦν δ᾽ ἁθρόα πάντ᾽ ἀπέτισεν .
The man , O Muse , inform , that many a way
wound with his wisdom to his wished stay ;
That wandered wondrous far , when he the town
Of sacred Troy had sack ' d and shivered down ;
The cities of a world of nations ,
With all their manners , minds , and fashions ,
He saw and knew ; at sea felt many woes ,
Much care sustained , to save from overthrows
Himself and friends in their retreat for home ;
But so their fates he could not overcome ,
Though much he thirsted it . O men unwise ,
They perish ' d by their own impieties ,
That in their hunger ' s rapine would not shun
The oxen of the lofty-going Sun ,
Who therefore from their eyes the day bereft
Of safe return . These acts , in some part left ,
Tell us , as others , deified Seed of Jove .
Now all the rest that austere death outstrove
At Troy ' s long siege at home safe anchor ' d are ,
Free from the malice both of sea and war ;
Only Ulysses is denied access
To wife and home . The grace of Goddesses ,
The reverend nymph Calypso , did detain
Him in her caves , past all the race of men
Enflam ' d to make him her lov ' d lord and spouse .
And when the Gods had destin ' d that his house ,
Which Ithaca on her rough bosom bears ,
( The point of time wrought out by ambient years )
Should be his haven , Contention still extends
Her envy to him , even amongst his friends .
All Gods took pity on him ; only he ,
That girds earth in the cincture of the sea ,
Divine Ulysses ever did envy ,
And made the fix ' d port of his birth to fly .
But he himself solemnized a retreat
To th ' Æthiops , far dissunder ' d in their seat ,
( In two parts parted , at the sun ' s descent ,
And underneath his golden orient ,
The first and last of men ) t ' enjoy their feast
Of bulls and lambs , in hecatombs address ' d ;
At which he sat , given over to delight .
The other Gods in heaven ' s supremest height
Were all in council met ; to whom began
The mighty Father both of God and man
Discourse , inducing matter that inclined
To wise Ulysses , calling to his mind
Faultful Ægisthus , who to death was done
By young Orestes , Agamemnon ' s son .
His memory to the Immortals then
Mov ' d Jove thus deeply : " O how falsely men
Accuse us Gods as authors of their ill ,
When by the bane their own bad lives instil
They suffer all the miseries of their states ,
Past our inflictions , and beyond their fates .
As now Ægisthus , past his fate , did wed
The wife of Agamemnon , and ( in dread
To suffer death himself ) to shun his ill ,
Incurred it by the loose bent of his will ,
In slaughtering Atrides in retreat .
Which we foretold him would so hardly set
To his murderous purpose , sending Mercury
That slaughter ' d Argus , our considerate spy ,
To give him this charge : ' Do not wed his wife ,
Nor murder him ; for thou shalt buy his life
With ransom of thine own , imposed on thee
By his Orestes , when in him shall be
Atrides ' self renew ' d , and but the prime
Of youth ' s spring put abroad , in thirst to climb
His haughty father ' s throne by his high acts . '
These words of Hermes wrought not into facts
Ægisthus ' powers ; good counsel he despised ,
And to that good his ill is sacrificed . "

( 220 ) 61% GRC
( 139 ) 39% GRC - ENG

( 232 ) 34% GRC - ENG
( 453 ) 66% ENG

Odyssey 10.274-306 Murray

Elias Eells /
  • Created on 2019-04-06 18:10:09
  • Modified on 2019-04-06 23:19:38
  • Aligned by Elias Eells
Ἑλληνική Transliterate
English
ὣς εἰπὼν παρὰ νηὸς ἀνήιον ἠδὲ θαλάσσης .
ἀλλ᾽ ὅτε δὴ ἄρ᾽ ἔμελλον ἰὼν ἱερὰς ἀνὰ βήσσας
Κίρκης ἵξεσθαι πολυφαρμάκου ἐς μέγα δῶμα ,
ἔνθα μοι Ἑρμείας χρυσόρραπις ἀντεβόλησεν
ἐρχομένῳ πρὸς δῶμα , νεηνίῃ ἀνδρὶ ἐοικώς ,
πρῶτον ὑπηνήτῃ , τοῦ περ χαριεστάτη ἥβη :
ἔν τ᾽ ἄρα μοι φῦ χειρί , ἔπος τ᾽ ἔφατ᾽ ἔκ τ᾽ ὀνόμαζε :
πῇ δὴ αὖτ᾽ , δύστηνε , δι᾽ ἄκριας ἔρχεαι οἶος ,
χώρου ἄιδρις ἐών ; ἕταροι δέ τοι οἵδ᾽ ἐνὶ Κίρκης
ἔρχαται ὥς τε σύες πυκινοὺς κευθμῶνας ἔχοντες .
τοὺς λυσόμενος δεῦρ᾽ ἔρχεαι ; οὐδέ σέ φημι
αὐτὸν νοστήσειν , μενέεις δὲ σύ γ᾽ , ἔνθα περ ἄλλοι .
ἀλλ᾽ ἄγε δή σε κακῶν ἐκλύσομαι ἠδὲ σαώσω .
τῆ , τόδε φάρμακον ἐσθλὸν ἔχων ἐς δώματα Κίρκης
ἔρχευ , κέν τοι κρατὸς ἀλάλκῃσιν κακὸν ἦμαρ .
πάντα δέ τοι ἐρέω ὀλοφώια δήνεα Κίρκης .
τεύξει τοι κυκεῶ , βαλέει δ᾽ ἐν φάρμακα σίτῳ .
ἀλλ᾽ οὐδ᾽ ὣς θέλξαι σε δυνήσεται : οὐ γὰρ ἐάσει
φάρμακον ἐσθλόν , τοι δώσω , ἐρέω δὲ ἕκαστα .
ὁππότε κεν Κίρκη σ᾽ ἐλάσῃ περιμήκεϊ ῥάβδῳ ,
δὴ τότε σὺ ξίφος ὀξὺ ἐρυσσάμενος παρὰ μηροῦ
Κίρκῃ ἐπαῖξαι , ὥς τε κτάμεναι μενεαίνων .
δέ σ᾽ ὑποδείσασα κελήσεται εὐνηθῆναι :
ἔνθα σὺ μηκέτ᾽ ἔπειτ᾽ ἀπανήνασθαι θεοῦ εὐνήν ,
ὄφρα κέ τοι λύσῃ θ᾽ ἑτάρους αὐτόν τε κομίσσῃ :
ἀλλὰ κέλεσθαί μιν μακάρων μέγαν ὅρκον ὀμόσσαι ,
μή τί τοι αὐτῷ πῆμα κακὸν βουλευσέμεν ἄλλο ,
μή σ᾽ ἀπογυμνωθέντα κακὸν καὶ ἀνήνορα θήῃ .
ὣς ἄρα φωνήσας πόρε φάρμακον ἀργεϊφόντης
ἐκ γαίης ἐρύσας , καί μοι φύσιν αὐτοῦ ἔδειξε .
ῥίζῃ μὲν μέλαν ἔσκε , γάλακτι δὲ εἴκελον ἄνθος :
μῶλυ δέ μιν καλέουσι θεοί : χαλεπὸν δέ τ᾽ ὀρύσσειν
ἀνδράσι γε θνητοῖσι , θεοὶ δέ τε πάντα δύνανται
So saying , I went up from the ship and the sea . But when , as I went through the sacred glades , I was about to come to the great house of the sorceress , Circe , then Hermes , of the golden wand , met me as I went toward the house , in the likeness of a young man with the first down upon his lip , in whom the charm of youth is fairest . [ 280 ] He clasped my hand , and spoke , and addressed me : " ‘Whither now again , hapless man , dost thou go alone through the hills , knowing naught of the country ? Lo , thy comrades yonder in the house of Circe are penned like swine in close-barred sties . And art thou come to release them ? Nay , I tell thee , thou shalt not thyself return , but shalt remain there with the others . But come , I will free thee from harm , and save thee . Here , take this potent herb , and go to the house of Circe , and it shall ward off from thy head the evil day . And I will tell thee all the baneful wiles of Circe . She will mix thee a potion , and cast drugs into the food ; but even so she shall not be able to bewitch thee , for the potent herb that I shall give thee will not suffer it . And I will tell thee all . When Circe shall smite thee with her long wand , then do thou draw thy sharp sword from beside thy thigh , and rush upon Circe , as though thou wouldst slay her . And she will be seized with fear , and will bid thee lie with her . Then do not thou thereafter refuse the couch of the goddess , that she may set free thy comrades , and give entertainment to thee . But bid her swear a great oath by the blessed gods , that she will not plot against thee any fresh mischief to thy hurt , lest when she has thee stripped she may render thee a weakling and unmanned . ’So saying , Argeiphontes gave me the herb , drawing it from the ground , and showed me its nature . At the root it was black , but its flower was like milk . Moly the gods call it , and it is hard for mortal men to dig ; but with the gods all things are possible .

( 20 ) 7% GRC
( 276 ) 93% GRC - ENG

( 399 ) 91% GRC - ENG
( 41 ) 9% ENG

Odyssey 10.274-306 Fagles

Elias Eells /
  • Created on 2019-04-06 17:27:59
  • Modified on 2019-04-06 23:25:12
  • Aligned by Elias Eells
Ἑλληνική Transliterate
English
urn:cts:greekLit:tlg0012.tlg002.perseus-grc1:10.274-10.306
ὣς εἰπὼν παρὰ νηὸς ἀνήιον ἠδὲ θαλάσσης .
ἀλλ᾽ ὅτε δὴ ἄρ᾽ ἔμελλον ἰὼν ἱερὰς ἀνὰ βήσσας
Κίρκης ἵξεσθαι πολυφαρμάκου ἐς μέγα δῶμα ,
ἔνθα μοι Ἑρμείας χρυσόρραπις ἀντεβόλησεν
ἐρχομένῳ πρὸς δῶμα , νεηνίῃ ἀνδρὶ ἐοικώς ,
πρῶτον ὑπηνήτῃ , τοῦ περ χαριεστάτη ἥβη :
ἔν τ᾽ ἄρα μοι φῦ χειρί , ἔπος τ᾽ ἔφατ᾽ ἔκ τ᾽ ὀνόμαζε :
πῇ δὴ αὖτ᾽ , δύστηνε , δι᾽ ἄκριας ἔρχεαι οἶος ,
χώρου ἄιδρις ἐών ; ἕταροι δέ τοι οἵδ᾽ ἐνὶ Κίρκης
ἔρχαται ὥς τε σύες πυκινοὺς κευθμῶνας ἔχοντες .
τοὺς λυσόμενος δεῦρ᾽ ἔρχεαι ; οὐδέ σέ φημι
αὐτὸν νοστήσειν , μενέεις δὲ σύ γ᾽ , ἔνθα περ ἄλλοι .
ἀλλ᾽ ἄγε δή σε κακῶν ἐκλύσομαι ἠδὲ σαώσω .
τῆ , τόδε φάρμακον ἐσθλὸν ἔχων ἐς δώματα Κίρκης
ἔρχευ , κέν τοι κρατὸς ἀλάλκῃσιν κακὸν ἦμαρ .
πάντα δέ τοι ἐρέω ὀλοφώια δήνεα Κίρκης .
τεύξει τοι κυκεῶ , βαλέει δ᾽ ἐν φάρμακα σίτῳ .
ἀλλ᾽ οὐδ᾽ ὣς θέλξαι σε δυνήσεται : οὐ γὰρ ἐάσει
φάρμακον ἐσθλόν , τοι δώσω , ἐρέω δὲ ἕκαστα .
ὁππότε κεν Κίρκη σ᾽ ἐλάσῃ περιμήκεϊ ῥάβδῳ ,
δὴ τότε σὺ ξίφος ὀξὺ ἐρυσσάμενος παρὰ μηροῦ
Κίρκῃ ἐπαῖξαι , ὥς τε κτάμεναι μενεαίνων .
δέ σ᾽ ὑποδείσασα κελήσεται εὐνηθῆναι :
ἔνθα σὺ μηκέτ᾽ ἔπειτ᾽ ἀπανήνασθαι θεοῦ εὐνήν ,
ὄφρα κέ τοι λύσῃ θ᾽ ἑτάρους αὐτόν τε κομίσσῃ :
ἀλλὰ κέλεσθαί μιν μακάρων μέγαν ὅρκον ὀμόσσαι ,
μή τί τοι αὐτῷ πῆμα κακὸν βουλευσέμεν ἄλλο ,
μή σ᾽ ἀπογυμνωθέντα κακὸν καὶ ἀνήνορα θήῃ .
ὣς ἄρα φωνήσας πόρε φάρμακον ἀργεϊφόντης
ἐκ γαίης ἐρύσας , καί μοι φύσιν αὐτοῦ ἔδειξε .
ῥίζῃ μὲν μέλαν ἔσκε , γάλακτι δὲ εἴκελον ἄνθος :
μῶλυ δέ μιν καλέουσι θεοί : χαλεπὸν δέ τ᾽ ὀρύσσειν
ἀνδράσι γε θνητοῖσι , θεοὶ δέ τε πάντα δύνανται .
Leaving the ship and shore , I headed inland ,
clambering up through hushed , entrancing glades until ,
as I was nearing the halls of Circe skilled in spells ,
approaching her palace Hermes god of the golden wand
crossed my path , and he looked for all the world
like a young man sporting his first beard ,
just in the prime and warm pride of youth ,
and grasped me by the hand and asked me kindly ,
' Where are you going now , my unlucky friend
trekking over the hills alone in unfamiliar country ?
And your men are all in there , in Circe ' s palace ,
cooped like swine , hock by jowl in the sties .
Have you come to set them free ?
Well , I warn you , you won ' t get home yourself ,
you ' ll stay right there , trapped with all the rest .
But wait , I can save you , free you from that great danger .
Look , here is a potent drug . Take it to Circe ' s halls
its power alone will shield you from the fatal day .
Let me tell you of all the witch ' s subtle craft . . .
She ' ll mix you a potion , lace the brew with drugs
but she ' ll be powerless to bewitch you , even so
this magic herb I give will fight her spells .
Now here ' s your plan of action , step by step .
The moment Circe strikes with her long thin wand ,
you draw your sharp sword sheathed at your hip
and rush her fast as if to run her through !
She ' ll cower in fear and coax you to her bed
but don ' t refuse the goddess ' bed , not then , not if
she ' s to release your friends and treat you well yourself .
But have her swear the binding oath of the blessed gods
she ' ll never plot some new intrigue to harm you ,
once you lie there naked
never unman you , strip away your courage ! '

With that the giant-killer handed over the magic herb .
pulling it from the earth ,
and Hermes showed me all its name and nature .
Its root is black and its flower white as milk
and the gods call it moly . Dangerous for a mortal man
to pluck from the soil but not for deathless gods .
All lies within their power .

( 55 ) 19% GRC
( 242 ) 81% GRC - ENG

( 388 ) 88% GRC - ENG
( 55 ) 12% ENG

Odyssey 1-20

Alexis Barselau /
  • Created on 2019-04-04 21:28:56
  • Modified on 2019-04-11 23:47:31
  • Aligned by Alexis Barselau
Ἑλληνική
English
English
Ἠὼς δʼ ἐκ λεχέων παρʼ ἀγαυοῦ Τιθωνοῖο ὤρνυθʼ , ἵνʼ ἀθανάτοισι φόως φέροι ἠδὲ βροτοῖσιν · οἱ δὲ θεοὶ θῶκόνδε καθίζανον , ἐν δʼ ἄρα τοῖσι Ζεὺς ὑψιβρεμέτης , οὗ τε κράτος ἐστὶ μέγιστον . τοῖσι δʼ Ἀθηναίη λέγε κήδεα πόλλʼ Ὀδυσῆος μνησαμένη · μέλε γάρ οἱ ἐὼν ἐν δώμασι νύμφης · Ζεῦ πάτερ ἠδʼ ἄλλοι μάκαρες θεοὶ αἰὲν ἐόντες , μή τις ἔτι πρόφρων ἀγανὸς καὶ ἤπιος ἔστω σκηπτοῦχος βασιλεύς , μηδὲ φρεσὶν αἴσιμα εἰδώς , ἀλλʼ αἰεὶ χαλεπός τʼ εἴη καὶ αἴσυλα ῥέζοι · ὡς οὔ τις μέμνηται Ὀδυσσῆος θείοιο λαῶν οἷσιν ἄνασσε , πατὴρ δʼ ὣς ἤπιος ἦεν . ἀλλʼ μὲν ἐν νήσῳ κεῖται κρατέρʼ ἄλγεα πάσχων νύμφης ἐν μεγάροισι Καλυψοῦς , μιν ἀνάγκῃ ἴσχει · δʼ οὐ δύναται ἣν πατρίδα γαῖαν ἱκέσθαι · οὐ γάρ οἱ πάρα νῆες ἐπήρετμοι καὶ ἑταῖροι , οἵ κέν μιν πέμποιεν ἐπʼ εὐρέα νῶτα θαλάσσης . νῦν αὖ παῖδʼ ἀγαπητὸν ἀποκτεῖναι μεμάασιν οἴκαδε νισόμενον · δʼ ἔβη μετὰ πατρὸς ἀκουὴν ἐς Πύλον ἠγαθέην ἠδʼ ἐς Λακεδαίμονα δῖαν .
Now Dawn arose from her couch from beside lordly Tithonus , to bear light to the immortals and to mortal men . And the gods were sitting down to council , and among them Zeus , who thunders on high , whose might is supreme .
To them Athena was recounting the many woes of Odysseus , as she called them to mind ; for it troubled her that he abode in the dwelling of the nymph : " Father Zeus , and ye other blessed gods that are forever , never henceforward let sceptred king with a ready heart be kind and gentle , nor let him heed righteousness in his mind ; but let him ever be harsh , and work unrighteousness , seeing that no one remembers divine Odysseus of the people whose lord he was ; yet gentle was he as a father . He verily abides in an island suffering grievous pains , in the halls of the nymph Calypso , who
keeps him perforce ; and he cannot return to his own land , for he has at hand no ships with oars and no comrades to send him on his way over the broad back of the sea . And now again they are minded to slay his well-loved son on his homeward way ; for he went in quest of tidings of his father
to sacred Pylos and to goodly Lacedaemon . "
And now , as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonos - harbinger of light alike to mortals and immortals - the gods met in council and with them , Zeus the lord of thunder , who is their king . Thereon Athena began to tell them of the many sufferings of Odysseus , for she pitied him away there in the house of the nymph Calypso . " Father Zeus , " said she , " and all you other gods that live in everlasting bliss , I hope there may never be such a thing as a kind and well-disposed ruler any more , nor one who will govern equitably . I hope they will be all henceforth cruel and unjust , for there is not one of his subjects who has not forgotten Odysseus , who ruled them as though he were their father . There he is , lying in great pain in an island where dwells the nymph Calypso , who will not let him go ; and he cannot get back to his own country , for he can find neither ships nor sailors to take him over the sea . Furthermore , wicked people are now trying to murder his only son Telemakhos , who is coming home from Pylos and Lacedaemon , where he has been to see if he can get news of his father . "

( 68 ) 40% GRC
( 103 ) 60% GRC - ENG

( 165 ) 68% GRC - ENG
( 76 ) 32% ENG

( 165 ) 68% GRC - ENG
( 76 ) 32% ENG

Odyssey 9.1-38 Fagles Translation Alignment

Robert Lester /
  • Created on 2019-04-04 07:13:36
  • Modified on 2019-04-15 20:18:53
  • Aligned by Robert Lester
Ἑλληνική Transliterate
English
τὸν δʼ ἀπαμειβόμενος προσέφη πολύμητις Ὀδυσσεύς ·
" Ἀλκίνοε κρεῖον , πάντων ἀριδείκετε λαῶν ,
τοι μὲν τόδε καλὸν ἀκουέμεν ἐστὶν ἀοιδοῦ
τοιοῦδʼ οἷος ὅδʼ ἐστί , θεοῖς ἐναλίγκιος αὐδήν .
οὐ γὰρ ἐγώ γέ τί φημι τέλος χαριέστερον εἶναι
ὅτʼ ἐυφροσύνη μὲν ἔχῃ κάτα δῆμον ἅπαντα ,
δαιτυμόνες δʼ ἀνὰ δώματʼ ἀκουάζωνται ἀοιδοῦ
ἥμενοι ἑξείης , παρὰ δὲ πλήθωσι τράπεζαι
σίτου καὶ κρειῶν , μέθυ δʼ ἐκ κρητῆρος ἀφύσσων
οἰνοχόος φορέῃσι καὶ ἐγχείῃ δεπάεσσι ·
τοῦτό τί μοι κάλλιστον ἐνὶ φρεσὶν εἴδεται εἶναι .
σοὶ δʼ ἐμὰ κήδεα θυμὸς ἐπετράπετο στονόεντα
εἴρεσθʼ , ὄφρʼ ἔτι μᾶλλον ὀδυρόμενος στεναχίζω ·
τί πρῶτόν τοι ἔπειτα , τί δʼ ὑστάτιον καταλέξω ;
κήδεʼ ἐπεί μοι πολλὰ δόσαν θεοὶ Οὐρανίωνες .
νῦν δʼ ὄνομα πρῶτον μυθήσομαι , ὄφρα καὶ ὑμεῖς
εἴδετʼ , ἐγὼ δʼ ἂν ἔπειτα φυγὼν ὕπο νηλεὲς ἦμαρ
ὑμῖν ξεῖνος ἔω καὶ ἀπόπροθι δώματα ναίων .
εἴμʼ Ὀδυσεὺς Λαερτιάδης , ὃς πᾶσι δόλοισιν
ἀνθρώποισι μέλω , καί μευ κλέος οὐρανὸν ἵκει .
ναιετάω δʼ Ἰθάκην ἐυδείελον · ἐν δʼ ὄρος αὐτῇ
Νήριτον εἰνοσίφυλλον , ἀριπρεπές · ἀμφὶ δὲ νῆσοι
πολλαὶ ναιετάουσι μάλα σχεδὸν ἀλλήλῃσι ,
Δουλίχιόν τε Σάμη τε καὶ ὑλήεσσα Ζάκυνθος .
αὐτὴ δὲ χθαμαλὴ πανυπερτάτη εἰν ἁλὶ κεῖται
πρὸς ζόφον , αἱ δέ τʼ ἄνευθε πρὸς ἠῶ τʼ ἠέλιόν τε ,
τρηχεῖʼ , ἀλλʼ ἀγαθὴ κουροτρόφος · οὔ τοι ἐγώ γε
ἧς γαίης δύναμαι γλυκερώτερον ἄλλο ἰδέσθαι .
μέν μʼ αὐτόθʼ ἔρυκε Καλυψώ , δῖα θεάων ,
ἐν σπέσσι γλαφυροῖσι , λιλαιομένη πόσιν εἶναι ·
ὣς δʼ αὔτως Κίρκη κατερήτυεν ἐν μεγάροισιν
Αἰαίη δολόεσσα , λιλαιομένη πόσιν εἶναι ·
ἀλλʼ ἐμὸν οὔ ποτε θυμὸν ἐνὶ στήθεσσιν ἔπειθον .
ὣς οὐδὲν γλύκιον ἧς πατρίδος οὐδὲ τοκήων
γίγνεται , εἴ περ καί τις ἀπόπροθι πίονα οἶκον
γαίῃ ἐν ἀλλοδαπῇ ναίει ἀπάνευθε τοκήων .
εἰ δʼ ἄγε τοι καὶ νόστον ἐμὸν πολυκηδέʼ ἐνίσπω ,
ὅν μοι Ζεὺς ἐφέηκεν ἀπὸ Τροίηθεν ἰόντι .
Odysseus , the great teller of tales , launched out on his story :
" Alcinous , majesty , shining among your island people ,
what a fine thing it is to listen to such a bard
as we have here—the man sings like a god .
The crown of life , I’d say . There’s nothing better
than when deep joy holds sway throughout the realm
and banqueters up and down the palace sit in ranks ,
enthralled to hear the bard , and before them all , the tables
heaped with bread and meats , and drawing wine from a mixing-bowl the steward makes his rounds and keeps the winecups flowing .
This , to my mind , is the best that life can offer .
But now you’re set on probing the bitter pains I’ve borne ,
so I’m to weep and grieve , it seems , still more . Well then , what shall I go through first ,
what shall I save for last ?
What pains—the gods have given me my share .
Now let me begin by telling you my name . . .
so you may know it well and I in times to come , if I can escape the fatal day , will be your host ,
your sworn friend , though my home is far from here .
I am Odysseus , son of Laertes , known to the world
for every kind of craft—my fame has reached the skies .
Sunny Ithaca is my home . Atop her stands our seamark ,
Mount Neriton’s leafy ridges shimmering in the wind .
Around her a ring of islands circle side-by-side , Dulichion , Same , wooded Zacynthus too , but mine lies low and away , the farthest out to sea ,
rearing into the western dusk
while the others face the east and breaking day . Mine is a rugged land but good for raising sons—
and I myself , I know no sweeter sight on earth than a man’s own native country .
True enough , Calypso the lustrous goddess tried to hold me back ,
deep in her arching caverns , craving me for a husband . So did Circe , holding me just as warmly in her halls , the bewitching queen of Aeaea keen to have me too . But they never won the heart inside me , never .
So nothing is as sweet as a man’s own country , his own parents , even though he’s settled down in some luxurious house , off in a foreign land and far from those who bore him .
No more . Come ,
let me tell you about the voyage fraught with hardship
Zeus inflicted on me , homeward bound from Troy

( 105 ) 34% GRC
( 208 ) 66% GRC - ENG

( 302 ) 65% GRC - ENG
( 166 ) 35% ENG

Odyssey 1-20

/
  • Created on 2019-04-03 05:05:38
  • Aligned by
Ἑλληνική
English
English
Ἠὼς δʼ ἐκ λεχέων παρʼ ἀγαυοῦ Τιθωνοῖο ὤρνυθʼ , ἵνʼ ἀθανάτοισι φόως φέροι ἠδὲ βροτοῖσιν · οἱ δὲ θεοὶ θῶκόνδε καθίζανον , ἐν δʼ ἄρα τοῖσι Ζεὺς ὑψιβρεμέτης , οὗ τε κράτος ἐστὶ μέγιστον . τοῖσι δʼ Ἀθηναίη λέγε κήδεα πόλλʼ Ὀδυσῆος μνησαμένη · μέλε γάρ οἱ ἐὼν ἐν δώμασι νύμφης · Ζεῦ πάτερ ἠδʼ ἄλλοι μάκαρες θεοὶ αἰὲν ἐόντες , μή τις ἔτι πρόφρων ἀγανὸς καὶ ἤπιος ἔστω σκηπτοῦχος βασιλεύς , μηδὲ φρεσὶν αἴσιμα εἰδώς , ἀλλʼ αἰεὶ χαλεπός τʼ εἴη καὶ αἴσυλα ῥέζοι · ὡς οὔ τις μέμνηται Ὀδυσσῆος θείοιο λαῶν οἷσιν ἄνασσε , πατὴρ δʼ ὣς ἤπιος ἦεν . ἀλλʼ μὲν ἐν νήσῳ κεῖται κρατέρʼ ἄλγεα πάσχων νύμφης ἐν μεγάροισι Καλυψοῦς , μιν ἀνάγκῃ ἴσχει · δʼ οὐ δύναται ἣν πατρίδα γαῖαν ἱκέσθαι · οὐ γάρ οἱ πάρα νῆες ἐπήρετμοι καὶ ἑταῖροι , οἵ κέν μιν πέμποιεν ἐπʼ εὐρέα νῶτα θαλάσσης . νῦν αὖ παῖδʼ ἀγαπητὸν ἀποκτεῖναι μεμάασιν οἴκαδε νισόμενον · δʼ ἔβη μετὰ πατρὸς ἀκουὴν ἐς Πύλον ἠγαθέην ἠδʼ ἐς Λακεδαίμονα δῖαν .
Now Dawn arose from her couch from beside lordly Tithonus , to bear light to the immortals and to mortal men . And the gods were sitting down to council , and among them Zeus , who thunders on high , whose might is supreme .
To them Athena was recounting the many woes of Odysseus , as she called them to mind ; for it troubled her that he abode in the dwelling of the nymph : " Father Zeus , and ye other blessed gods that are forever , never henceforward let sceptred king with a ready heart be kind and gentle , nor let him heed righteousness in his mind ; but let him ever be harsh , and work unrighteousness , seeing that no one remembers divine Odysseus of the people whose lord he was ; yet gentle was he as a father . He verily abides in an island suffering grievous pains , in the halls of the nymph Calypso , who
keeps him perforce ; and he cannot return to his own land , for he has at hand no ships with oars and no comrades to send him on his way over the broad back of the sea . And now again they are minded to slay his well-loved son on his homeward way ; for he went in quest of tidings of his father
to sacred Pylos and to goodly Lacedaemon . "
And now , as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonos - harbinger of light alike to mortals and immortals - the gods met in council and with them , Zeus the lord of thunder , who is their king . Thereon Athena began to tell them of the many sufferings of Odysseus , for she pitied him away there in the house of the nymph Calypso . " Father Zeus , " said she , " and all you other gods that live in everlasting bliss , I hope there may never be such a thing as a kind and well-disposed ruler any more , nor one who will govern equitably . I hope they will be all henceforth cruel and unjust , for there is not one of his subjects who has not forgotten Odysseus , who ruled them as though he were their father . There he is , lying in great pain in an island where dwells the nymph Calypso , who will not let him go ; and he cannot get back to his own country , for he can find neither ships nor sailors to take him over the sea . Furthermore , wicked people are now trying to murder his only son Telemakhos , who is coming home from Pylos and Lacedaemon , where he has been to see if he can get news of his father . "

( 73 ) 43% GRC
( 98 ) 57% GRC - ENG

( 156 ) 65% GRC - ENG
( 85 ) 35% ENG

( 156 ) 65% GRC - ENG
( 85 ) 35% ENG

Odyssey 9.1-38 Wilson Translation Alignment

Robert Lester /
  • Created on 2019-04-02 18:57:15
  • Modified on 2019-04-08 15:46:04
  • Translated by Wilson
  • Aligned by Robert Lester
Ἑλληνική Transliterate
English
τὸν δʼ ἀπαμειβόμενος προσέφη πολύμητις Ὀδυσσεύς ·
" Ἀλκίνοε κρεῖον , πάντων ἀριδείκετε λαῶν ,
τοι μὲν τόδε καλὸν ἀκουέμεν ἐστὶν ἀοιδοῦ
τοιοῦδʼ οἷος ὅδʼ ἐστί , θεοῖς ἐναλίγκιος αὐδήν .
οὐ γὰρ ἐγώ γέ τί φημι τέλος χαριέστερον εἶναι
ὅτʼ ἐυφροσύνη μὲν ἔχῃ κάτα δῆμον ἅπαντα ,
δαιτυμόνες δʼ ἀνὰ δώματʼ ἀκουάζωνται ἀοιδοῦ
ἥμενοι ἑξείης , παρὰ δὲ πλήθωσι τράπεζαι
σίτου καὶ κρειῶν , μέθυ δʼ ἐκ κρητῆρος ἀφύσσων
οἰνοχόος φορέῃσι καὶ ἐγχείῃ δεπάεσσι ·
τοῦτό τί μοι κάλλιστον ἐνὶ φρεσὶν εἴδεται εἶναι .
σοὶ δʼ ἐμὰ κήδεα θυμὸς ἐπετράπετο στονόεντα
εἴρεσθʼ , ὄφρʼ ἔτι μᾶλλον ὀδυρόμενος στεναχίζω ·
τί πρῶτόν τοι ἔπειτα , τί δʼ ὑστάτιον καταλέξω ;
κήδεʼ ἐπεί μοι πολλὰ δόσαν θεοὶ Οὐρανίωνες .
νῦν δʼ ὄνομα πρῶτον μυθήσομαι , ὄφρα καὶ ὑμεῖς
εἴδετʼ , ἐγὼ δʼ ἂν ἔπειτα φυγὼν ὕπο νηλεὲς ἦμαρ
ὑμῖν ξεῖνος ἔω καὶ ἀπόπροθι δώματα ναίων .
εἴμʼ Ὀδυσεὺς Λαερτιάδης , ὃς πᾶσι δόλοισιν
ἀνθρώποισι μέλω , καί μευ κλέος οὐρανὸν ἵκει .
ναιετάω δʼ Ἰθάκην ἐυδείελον · ἐν δʼ ὄρος αὐτῇ
Νήριτον εἰνοσίφυλλον , ἀριπρεπές · ἀμφὶ δὲ νῆσοι
πολλαὶ ναιετάουσι μάλα σχεδὸν ἀλλήλῃσι ,
Δουλίχιόν τε Σάμη τε καὶ ὑλήεσσα Ζάκυνθος .
αὐτὴ δὲ χθαμαλὴ πανυπερτάτη εἰν ἁλὶ κεῖται
πρὸς ζόφον , αἱ δέ τʼ ἄνευθε πρὸς ἠῶ τʼ ἠέλιόν τε ,
τρηχεῖʼ , ἀλλʼ ἀγαθὴ κουροτρόφος · οὔ τοι ἐγώ γε
ἧς γαίης δύναμαι γλυκερώτερον ἄλλο ἰδέσθαι .
μέν μʼ αὐτόθʼ ἔρυκε Καλυψώ , δῖα θεάων ,
ἐν σπέσσι γλαφυροῖσι , λιλαιομένη πόσιν εἶναι ·
ὣς δʼ αὔτως Κίρκη κατερήτυεν ἐν μεγάροισιν
Αἰαίη δολόεσσα , λιλαιομένη πόσιν εἶναι ·
ἀλλʼ ἐμὸν οὔ ποτε θυμὸν ἐνὶ στήθεσσιν ἔπειθον .
ὣς οὐδὲν γλύκιον ἧς πατρίδος οὐδὲ τοκήων
γίγνεται , εἴ περ καί τις ἀπόπροθι πίονα οἶκον
γαίῃ ἐν ἀλλοδαπῇ ναίει ἀπάνευθε τοκήων .
εἰ δʼ ἄγε τοι καὶ νόστον ἐμὸν πολυκηδέʼ ἐνίσπω ,
ὅν μοι Ζεὺς ἐφέηκεν ἀπὸ Τροίηθεν ἰόντι .
Wily Odysseus , the lord of lies ,
answered ,
" My lord Alcinous , great king ,
it is a splendid thing to hear a poet
as talented as this . His voice is godlike .
I think that there can be no greater pleasure
than when the whole community enjoys
a banquet , as we sit inside the house ,
and listen to the singer , and the tables
are heaped with bread and meat ; the wine boy ladles
drink from the bowl and pours it into cups .
To me this seems ideal , a thing of beauty .
Now something prompted you to ask about
my own sad story . I will tell you , though
the memory increases my despair .
Where shall I start ? Where can I end ? The gods
have given me so much to cry about .
First I will tell my name , so we will be
acquainted and if I survive , you can
" quainted and if I survive , you can
be my guest in my distant home one day .
I am Odysseus , Laertes’ son ,
known for my many clever tricks and lies .
My fame extends to heaven , but I live
in Ithaca , where shaking forest hides
Mount Neriton . Close by are other islands :
Dulichium , and wooded Zacynthus
and Same . All the others face the dawn ;
my Ithaca is set apart , most distant ,
facing the dark . It is a rugged land ,
but good at raising children . To my eyes
no country could be sweeter . As you know ,
divine Calpyso held me in her cave ,
wanting to marry me ; and likewise Circe ,
the trickster , trapped me , and she wanted me
to be her husband . But she never swayed
my heart , since when a man is far from home ,
living abroad , there is no sweeter thing
than his own native land and family .
Now let me tell you all the trouble