Apuleius, Metamorphoses 8.19-21

Queen Trapp /
  • Created on 2018-10-12 04:48:49
  • Modified on 2018-10-15 05:03:04
  • Aligned by Queen Trapp
Latin
English
English
Interea quidam senex de summo colle prospectat , quem circum capellae pascentes opilionem esse profecto clamabant . Eum rogavit unus e nostris haberetne venui lactem vel adhuc liquidum vel in caseum recentem inchoatum . At ille diu capite quassanti Vos autem inquit De cibo vel poculo ) vel omnino ulla refectione nunc cogitatis ? An nulli scitis quo loco comederitis ? Et cum dicto conductis oviculis conversus longe recessit . Quae vox eius et fuga pastoribus nostris non mediocrem pavorem incussit : ac dum perterriti de loci qualitate sciscitari gestiunt nec est qui doceat , senex alius , magnus ille quidem , gravatus annis , totus in baculum pronus et lassum trahens vestigium , ubertim lacrimans per viam proximat , visisque nobis cum fletu maximo singulorum iuvenum genua contingens sic adorabat :

Per fortunas vestrosque genios , sic ad meae senectutis spatia validi laetique veniatis , decepto seni subsistite meumque parvulum ab inferis ereptum canis meis reddite . Nepos namque meus et itineris huius suavis comes dum forte passerem incantantem saepiculae consectatur arripere , delapsus in proxumam foveam , quae fruticibus imis subpatet , in extremo iam vitae consistit periculo , quippe cum de fletu ac voce

ipsius avum sibi saepicule clamitantis vivere illum quidem sentiam , sed per corporis , ut videtis , mei defectam valitudinem opitulari nequeam . At vobis aetatis et roboris beneficio facile est suppetiari miserrimo seni puerumque illum novissimum successionis meae atque unicam stirpem sospitem mihi facere .

Sic deprecantis suamque canitiem distrahentis totos quidem miseruit ; sed unus prae ceteris et animo fortior et aetate iuvenior et corpore validior , quique solus praeter alios incolumis proelium superius evaserat , exsurgit alacer et percontatus quonam loci puer , ille decidisset , monstrantem digito non longe frutices horridos senem illum impigre comitatur . Ac dum pabulo nostro suaque cura refecti sarcinulis quisque sumptis suis viam capessunt , clamore primum nominatim cientes illum iuvenem frequenter inclamant ; mox mora diutina commoti mittunt e suis arcessitorem unum , qui requisitum comitem tempestivae viae commonefactum reduceret . At ille modicum commoratus refert sese buxanti pallore trepidus miraque super conservo suo renuntiat : conspicatum se quippe supinato illi et iam ex maxima parte consumpto immanem draconem mandentem insistere nec ullum usquam miserrimum senem comparere illum . Qua re cognita et cum pastoris sermone collata , qui saevum prorsus hunc illum nec alium locorum inquilinum praeminabatur , pestilenti deserta regione velociori se fuga proripiunt . nosque pellunt crebris tundentes fustibus .
Meanwhile an old man was watching us from the top of a neighbouring hill , obviously a shepherd , for there were goats grazing around him . One of our men asked him whether he had any milk for sale , either fresh or in the form of new cheese . For a long time he merely shook his head . At last , ‘Are you thinking , he asked , ‘of food or drink or any kind of refreshment now ? Haven’t you any idea where you’ve chosen to stop ? And so saying he rounded up his
flock , turned about , and left the scene . His words and his
disappearance greatly alarmed our herdsmen . Panic-stricken , they
were anxiously asking each other what sort of a place this was and
finding nobody to tell them , when there appeared on the road
another old man , this one tall but bowed down by age , leaning heavily
on a staff and wearily dragging his feet , and weeping profusely . When
he saw us he burst out crying , and supplicating each man in turn he
uttered the following appeal :

‘I implore you by your Fortunes and your Guardian Spirits , if you
hope to reach my age in health and happiness , come to the aid of an
old man in his bereavement , rescue my little boy from death and
restore him to his white-haired grandfather . My grandson , my darling
traveling-companion , was trying to catch a bird that was singing in
the hedgerow , and fell into a yawning pit in the bottom of the
thicket . Now he is in peril of his life ; I know he is alive , for I can
hear him crying and calling " Grandfather " over and over again , but as
you see I am too feeble in body to be able to rescue him . But you are
young and strong , and it will be no trouble to you to help a poor old
man and to restore to me this child , the last of my line and all the
family I have left . '

As he uttered this plea and tore his white hair , everybody pitied him . Then one of them , braver and younger and stronger than the
rest , the only one who had come off unscathed from the recent battle ,
jumped up eagerly and asked where exactly the boy had fallen in . The
old man pointed out a thicket not far away , and the volunteer went
off briskly with him . After a while , when we animals had grazed and
the men had seen to themselves and felt restored , they all began to
pack up and get ready to move off . First of all they called the
volunteer by name , with loud and repeated shouts ; then alarmed by
the prolonged delay they sent a messenger to find him and warn him
that it was time to leave , and bring him back . Almost immediately
the messenger reappeared , deathly pale and terrified , with dreadful
news of his fellow servant . He had found him lying half-eaten , with a
monstrous serpent crouched over him and devouring him , and of the
poor old man not a sign anywhere . Hearing this and recollecting what
the old shepherd had said , they realized that this indeed was the
fierce denizen of the region that he had been threatening them with ,
and at once quitted the pestilential place and fled precipitately ,
urging us animals on with continual beating .
In the meane season wee perceived an old man , who seemed to be a Shepheard , by reason of the Goates and Sheep that fed round about him . Then one of our company demanded whether he had any milke , butter , or cheese to sell . To whom he made answere saying : Doe you looke for any meate or drinke , or any other refection here ? Know you not in what place you be ?

And therewithall he tooke his sheepe and drave them away as fast as he might possible . This answere made our shepheards greatly to feare , that they thought of nothing else , but to enquire what Country they were in : Howbeit they saw no manner of person of whom they might demand . At length as they were thus in doubt , they perceived another old man with a staffe in his hand very weary with travell , who approaching nigh to our company , began to weepe and complaine saying : Alas masters I pray you succour me miserable caitife , and restore my nephew to me againe , that by following a sparrow that flew before him , is fallen into a ditch hereby , and verily I thinke he is in danger of death . As for me , I am not able to helpe him out by reason of mine old age , but you that are so valiant and lusty may easily helpe me herein , and deliver me my boy , my heire and guide of my life . These words made us all to pity him . And then the youngest and stoutest of our company , who alone escaped best the late skirmish of Dogges and stones , rose up and demanded in what ditch the boy was fallen : Mary ( quod he ) yonder , and pointed with his finger , and brought him to a great thicket of bushes and thornes where they both entred in . In the meane season , after we cured our wounds , we tooke up our packs , purposing to depart away . And because we would not goe away without the young man our fellow : The shepheards whistled and called for him , but when he gave no answer , they sent one out of their company to seeke him out , who after a while returned againe with a pale face and sorrowfull newes , saying that he saw a terrible Dragon eating and devouring their companion : and as for the old man , hee could see him in no place . When they heard this , ( remembring likewise the words of the first old man that shaked his head , and drave away his sheep ) they ran away beating us before them , to fly from this desart and pestilent Country .

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Apuleius, Metamorphoses 8.22

Amy Murphy /
  • Created on 2018-10-11 19:41:17
  • Modified on 2018-10-15 06:38:13
  • Aligned by Amy Murphy
Latin
English
English
Celerrime denique longo itinere confecto pagum quendam accedimus ibique totam perquiescimus noctem . Ibi coeptum facinus oppido memorabile narrare cupio . Servus quidam , cui cunctam familiae tutelam dominus permiserat , suus quique possessionem maximam illam , in quam deverteramus , vilicabat , habens ex eodem famulitio conservam coniugam , liberae cuiusdam extrariaeque mulieris flagrabat cupidine . Quo dolore paelicatus uxor eius instricta cunctas mariti rationes et quicquid horreo reconditum continebatur admoto combussit igne . Nec tali damno tori sui contumeliam vindicasse contenta , iam contra sua saeviens viscera laqueum sibi nectit , infantulumque , quem de eodem marito iam dudum susceperat , eodem funiculo nectit seque per altissimum puteum adpendicem parvulum trahens praecipitat . Quam mortem dominus eorum aegerrime sustinens adreptum servulum , qui causam tanti sceleris luxurie sua praestiterat , nudum ac totum melle perlitum firmiter alligavit arbori ficulneae , cuius in ipso carioso stipite inhabitantium formicarum nidificia bulliebant et ultro citro commeabant multiiuga scaturrigine . Quae simul dulcem ac mellitum corporis nidorem persentiscunt , parvis quidem sed numerosis et continuis morsiunculis penitus inhaerentes , per longi temporis cruciatum ita , carnibus atque ipsis visceribus adesis , homine consumpto membra nudarunt , ut ossa tantum viduata pulpis nitore nimio candentia funestae cohaererent arbori .

After a long day moving at breakneck pace , we came to a village where we stayed the night , a place where a noteworthy crime had been committed which I’ll relate . A servant , whose master had made him steward of his entire estate , had previously acted as bailiff therefore of the large holding where we had stopped for the night . He was married to a servant in the same household , but burned with love for a freedwoman , who lived outside his master’s estate . Angered by her husband’s disloyalty , the wife set fire to his store-room and all his accounts , destroying both utterly . Not content with this act as revenge for the insult to her marriage , she turned her bitter rage against her own flesh . Tying a rope round her own neck and that of the child she’d just borne her husband , she hurled herself into a deep well , dragging the infant with her . Their master , horrified at their deaths , had the servant , whose infidelity had provoked the dreadful tragedy , arrested , stripped naked and smeared with honey , and tied to a rotting fig-tree inside whose trunk lived a colony of nesting ants that marched in and out in their myriad streams . Detecting the sweet sugary scent on his body , they quickly fastened their tiny jaws in his skin , wounding him deeply with endlessly repeated bites , until after interminable torment , he died . His flesh and his innards were totally consumed and his body stripped to the bare bones which , gleaming a brilliant white , were left tied to the tree .
. So after a long stage at top speed we came to a village where we rested for the night . At this place there had been perpetrated a deed that was so memorable that I propose to put it on record . It concerned a certain slave to whom his master had confided the whole management of his household and who was the steward of the large estate where we had stopped . He had as his consort another slave from the household , but he was madly in love with somebody else , a free woman who was not a member of the family . His wife was so enraged by his infidelity that she made a bonfire of all her husband’s account-books and the entire contents of the barns and storehouses . Then , not thinking this enough of a revenge for the affront to her marriage-bed , she turned her fury against her own flesh and blood : passing a noose around her neck , with the same rope she tied to herself the little boy that she had had by her husband , and threw herself down a deep well , dragging the child down with her . Their master , greatly upset by her death , arrested the slave whose lust had been the cause of such a crime , had him stripped naked and smeared all over with honey and lashed tightly to a fig-tree . This had in its hollow trunk an ants’ nest , swarming and seething with their multitudinous comings and goings . Directly they sensed the sweet honeyed scent of the man’s body they battened on it with their tiny jaws , nibbling endlessly away in their thousands until after many days of torture they had devoured him completely , entrails and all , leaving his bones bare ; only his gleaming white skeleton , stripped of flesh , was left fastened to the fatal tree .

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Apuleius, Metamorphoses 8.21

Amy Murphy /
  • Created on 2018-10-11 19:40:01
  • Modified on 2018-10-15 04:43:58
  • Aligned by Amy Murphy
Latin
English
English
Sic deprecantis suamque canitiem distrahentis totos quidem miseruit . Sed unus prae ceteris et animo fortior et aetate iuvenior et corpore validior , quique solus praeter alios incolumis proelium superius evaserat , exsurgit alacer et percontatus quonam loci puer ille decidisset monstrantem digito non longe frutices horridos senem illum inpigre comitatur . Ac dum pabulo nostro suaque cura refecti sarcinulis quisque sumptis suis viam capessunt , clamore primum nominatim cientes illum iuvenem frequenter inclamant , mox mora diutina commoti mittunt e suis arcessitorem unum , qui requisitum comitem tempestivae viae commonefactum reduceret . At ille modicum commoratum refert sese : buxanti pallore trepidus mira super conservo suo renuntiat : conspicatum se quippe supinato illi et iam ex maxima parte consumpto immanem draconem mandentem insistere nec ullum usquam miserrimum senem comparere illum . Qua re cognita et cum pastoris sermone conlata , qui saevum prorsus hunc illum nec alium locorum inquilinum praeminabatur , pestilenti deserta regione velociori se fuga proripiunt nosque pellunt crebris tundentes fustibus .
We were all filled with pity as he begged us to help and tore at his grey hair . One of the younger men , stouter of heart , and stronger of limb than the others , the only one of us uninjured in the recent battle , leapt up readily and asked where the boy was . The old man pointed with his finger to a clump of bushes , and the youth set off in his company . When we animals had grazed , and the humans had tended their wounds and were refreshed , we all rose with our loads and started down the road . At first they shouted and called the young man’s name repeatedly , then anxious at his delay they sent someone off to find their missing comrade , tell him we were off , and bring him back . Soon the messenger returned , trembling and pale as boxwood , with a strange tale to tell of his friend . He had seen his body he said , lying on its back , almost totally eaten by a vast serpent . The snake was coiled above him as it consumed him , but the poor old man was nowhere to be seen . Hearing this , and matching it to the goat-herd’s earlier remarks , who must have been warning them of none another than this same denizen of the place , they fled from that pestilential region , travelling more swiftly than before , driving us along rapidly with repeated blows of their sticks .
As he uttered this plea and tore his white hair , everybody pitied
him . Then one of them , braver and younger and stronger than the rest , the only one who had come off unscathed from the recent battle , jumped up eagerly and asked where exactly the boy had fallen in . The old man pointed out a thicket not far away , and the volunteer went off briskly with him . After a while , when we animals had grazed and the men had seen to themselves and felt restored , they all began to pack up and get ready to move off . First of all they called the volunteer by name , with loud and repeated shouts ; then alarmed by the prolonged delay they sent a messenger to find him and warn him that it was time to leave , and bring him back . Almost immediately the messenger reappeared , deathly pale and terrified , with dreadful news of his fellow servant . He had found him lying half-eaten , with a monstrous serpent crouched over him and devouring him , and of the poor old man not a sign anywhere . Hearing this and recollecting what the old shepherd had said , they realized that this indeed was the fierce denizen of the region that he had been threatening them with , and at once quitted the pestilential place and fled precipitately , urging us animals on with continual beating .

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Book V : 1-3 The tale of Cupid and Psyche : the palace

Ava DeVine /
  • Created on 2018-10-11 19:29:30
  • Modified on 2018-10-14 22:45:29
  • Translated by Perseus Cat
  • Aligned by Ava DeVine
Latin
English
English
http://data.perseus.org/citations/urn:cts:latinLit:phi1212.phi002.perseus-lat1:5.3
Psyche teneris et herbosis locis in ipso toro roscidi graminis suave recubans , tanta mentis perturbatione sedata , dulce conquievit . Iamque sufficienti recreata somno placido resurgit animo : videt lucum proceris et vastis arboribus consitum , videt fontem vitreo latice perlucidum medio luci meditullio . Prope fontis allapsum domus regia est , aedificata non humanis manibus sed divinis artibus : iam scies ab introitu primo dei cuiuspiam luculentum et amoenum videre te diversorium . Nam summa laquearia , citro et ebore curiose cavata , subeunt aureae columnae , parietes omnes argenteo caelamine conteguntur , bestiis et id genus pecudibus occurrentibus ob os introeuntium . Mirus prorsum homo , immo semideus vel certe deus , qui magnae artis subtilitate tantum efferavit argentum : enimvero pavimenta ipsa lapide pretioso caesim deminuto in varia picturae genera discriminantur : vehementer iterum ac saepius beatos illos qui super gemmas et monilia calcant ! Iam ceterae partes longe [ p . 202 ] lateque dispositae domus sine pretio pretiosae totique parietes solidati massis aureis splendore proprio coruscant , ut diem suum sibi domus faciat licet sole nolente ; sic cubicula , sic porticus , sic ipsae valvae fulgurant . Nec setius opes ceterae maiestati domui respondent , ut equidem illud recte videatur ad conversationem humanam magno Iovi fabricatum caeleste palatium .

‘2 . Invitata Psyche talium locorum oblectatione propius accessit et paulo fidentior intra limen sese facit , mox prolectante studio pulcherrimae visionis rimatur singula et altrinsecus aedium horrea sublimi fabrica perfecta magnisque congesta gazis conspicit ; nec est quicquam quod ibi non est : sed praeter ceteram tantarum divitiarum admirationem hoc erat praecipue mirificum , quod nullo vinculo , nullo claustro nullo custode totius orbis thesaurus ille muniebatur Haec ei summa cum voluptate visenti offert sese vox quaedam corporis sui nuda , et ‘Quid , inquit Domina , tantis obstupescis opibus ? Tua sunt haec omnia . prohinc cubiculo te refer , et lectulo lassitudinem refove , et ex arbitrio lavacrum pete . Nos quarum voces accipis , tuae famulae ; sedulo tibi praeministrabimus nec corporis curatae tibi regales epulae morabuntur .

3 . Sensit Psyche divinae providentiae beatitudinem monitusque , voces informes audiens , et prius somno et mox lavacro fatigationem sui diluit , visoque statim proximo semirotundo suggestu , propter instrumentum [ p . 204 ] cenatorium rata refectui suo commodum , libens accumbit . Et illico vini nectarei eduliumque variorum fercula copiosa , nullo serviente sed tantum spiritui quodam impulsa , subministrantur : nec quemquam tamen illa videre poterat , sed verba tantum audiebat excidentia et solas voces famulas habebat . Post opimas dapes quidam introcessit et cantavit invisus et alius citharam pulsavit , quae videbatur nec ipsa : tunc . modulatae multitudinis conferta vox aures eius affertur , ut , quamvis hominum nemo pareret , chorus tamen esse pateret .
Book V : 1-3 The tale of Cupid and Psyche : the palace

Psyche , pleasantly reclining in that grassy place on a bed of dew-wet grass , free of her mental perturbation , fell peacefully asleep , and when she was sufficiently refreshed by slumber , rose , feeling calm . She saw a grove planted with great , tall trees ; she saw a glittering fount of crystal water .
At the very centre of the grove beside the flowing stream was a regal palace , not made by human hands , but built by divine art . You knew from the moment you entered you were viewing the splendid shining residence of a god . There were coffered ceilings , exquisitely carved from ivory and citron-wood supported on golden pillars ; the walls were covered with relief-work in silver , wild beasts in savage herds met your gaze as you reached the doorway . They were the work of some eminent master , or a demigod or god perhaps , who with the subtlety of great art had made creatures all of silver . Even the floors were of mosaic , pictures patterned from precious stones cut into tiny tiles . Blessed twice over or more are those who tread on shining jewels and gems ! The length and breadth of the rest of the house was equally beyond price , the walls constructed of solid gold gleaming with their own brilliance , so that even without the sun’s rays the house shone like day . The rooms , the colonnades , the very doorposts glowed . And every other feature matched the house in magnificence , so you would have thought , rightly , that this was a heavenly palace made for Jove to use on his visits to the world .
Seduced by the attractions of this lovely place Psyche moved closer and , gaining confidence , dared to cross the threshold . Now her desire to gaze on all these beautiful things led her to examine every object closely . On the far side of the palace she found storerooms made with noble skill , heaped to the roof with mounds of treasure . All that existed was there . And beyond her amazement at the vast quantities of riches , she was especially startled to find not a lock , or bolt or chain to defend this treasure-house of all the world . As she looked around her , in rapturous delight , a bodiless voice spoke to her : " Lady , why are you so surprised at all this vast wealth ? All that is here is yours . So retire to your room , and ease your weariness on the bed , and when you wish you can bathe . The voices you may hear are those of your servants , we who wait on you willingly , and when your body is refreshed we will be ready with a feast . "
Psyche felt blessed by divine providence , and obeying the guidance of the disembodied voice , eased her weariness with sleep and then a bath . Nearby she found a semi-circular table , and judging from the dinner setting that it was meant for her , she promptly sat down to wait . Instantly trays loaded with food and cups of nectar appeared , without trace of servants , they were wafted and set before her as though by a breath of air . No one was visible , but words could be heard from somewhere , her waiters were merely voices . And after a sumptuous meal , someone invisible came and sang , and someone played a lyre , invisible too . And there came to her ears the interweaving melodies of some large throng , some invisible choir .
H . E . Butler’s English translation for Oxford Clarendon Press ( 1910 ) on Archive . org :
Psyche lay sweetly reclined in that soft grassy place
on a couch of herbage fresh with dew . Her wild anguish
of spirit was assuaged and she fell softly asleep . When
she had slumbered enough and was refreshed , she rose
to her feet . The tempest had passed from her soul .
She beheld a grove of huge and lofty trees , she beheld
a transparent fountain of glassy water . In the very
heart of the grove beside the gliding stream there stood
a palace , built by no human hands but by the cunning
of a god . You will perceive so soon as I have taken
you within , that it is the pleasant and luxurious dwelling
of some deity that I present to your gaze . For the
fretted roof on high was curiously carved of sandalwood
and ivory , and the columns that upheld it were of gold .
All the walls were covered with wild beasts and other
like creatures of the field , wrought in chased silver , and
confronting the gaze of those that entered . Truly he
was a wondrous wight , nay , he was some demigod , or
rather in very truth a god , that had power by the subtlety
of his matchless skill to put such wild life into silver .
The pavement was of precious stones cut small and
patterned with images of many kinds . Most surely , aye ,
again and yet again I say it , blessed are those whose
feet tread upon gems and jewels . The rest of the
house through all its length and breadth was precious eyond price . All the walls were built of solid ingots
of gold and shone with peculiar splendour , making
a daylight of their own within the house , even though the
sun should withhold his beams . Such were the lightnings
flashed from bedchamber and colonnade and from the
very doors themselves . Nor were the riches in the rest
of the house unworthy of such splendour . It seemed
a heavenly palace built by great Jove that he might
dwell with mortal men . Allured by the charm and 2
beauty of the place , Psyche drew near and , as her
confidence increased , crossed the threshold . Soon the
delight of gazing on such loveliness drew her on to
explore each several glory until at last on the farther
side of the house she beheld a lofty chamber piled
high with countless treasure . Naught may be found
in all the world that was not there . But wondrous as
was the sight of such vast wealth , yet more marvellous
was it that there was no chain nor bar nor sentinel to
guard the treasure of all the world . Deep joy filled
her at the sight , when suddenly a bodiless voice spake
to her . " Why , lady , " it said , " are you overwhelmed
at the sight of so great wealth ? All is yours . Go
now to your chamber , refresh your weariness upon your
couch , and bathe when it pleases you so to do . We ,
whose voices you hear , are your servants who will wait
upon you diligently and , when you have refreshed your
body , will straightway serve you with a royal banquet . " over her . First for a while she slept , then waking ,
bathed to refresh her weariness . This done , she beheld
hard by a couch shaped like a half-moon , and , deeming
from the dinner service spread beside it that it was
meant for her refreshment , gladly laid her down . Forth-
with she was served with wine like nectar , and many
a dish of diverse viands . Yet no man waited on her ,
but all things seemed wafted to her as it were by some
wind . Neither could she see any man , only she heard
words that fell from the air , and none save voices were
her servants . After she had feasted thus daintily , one
whom she might not see entered and sang to her , while
another struck the lyre , though never a lyre was to be
seen . Then the harmony of a multitude of musicians
was borne to her ears , so that she knew that a choir
4 was there , though no man was visible .

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Ava DeVine /
  • Created on 2018-10-11 19:25:06
  • Aligned by Ava DeVine
Latin
English
English
https://archive.org/stream/metamorphosesorg01apuluoft/metamorphosesorg01apuluoft_djvu.txt
Psyche teneris et herbosis locis in ipso toro roscidi graminis suave recubans , tanta mentis perturbatione sedata , dulce conquievit . Iamque sufficienti recreata somno placido resurgit animo : videt lucum proceris et vastis arboribus consitum , videt fontem vitreo latice perlucidum medio luci meditullio . Prope fontis allapsum domus regia est , aedificata non humanis manibus sed divinis artibus : iam scies ab introitu primo dei cuiuspiam luculentum et amoenum videre te diversorium . Nam summa laquearia , citro et ebore curiose cavata , subeunt aureae columnae , parietes omnes argenteo caelamine conteguntur , bestiis et id genus pecudibus occurrentibus ob os introeuntium . Mirus prorsum homo , immo semideus vel certe deus , qui magnae artis subtilitate tantum efferavit argentum : enimvero pavimenta ipsa lapide pretioso caesim deminuto in varia picturae genera discriminantur : vehementer iterum ac saepius beatos illos qui super gemmas et monilia calcant ! Iam ceterae partes longe [ p . 202 ] lateque dispositae domus sine pretio pretiosae totique parietes solidati massis aureis splendore proprio coruscant , ut diem suum sibi domus faciat licet sole nolente ; sic cubicula , sic porticus , sic ipsae valvae fulgurant . Nec setius opes ceterae maiestati domui respondent , ut equidem illud recte videatur ad conversationem humanam magno Iovi fabricatum caeleste palatium .

‘2 . Invitata Psyche talium locorum oblectatione propius accessit et paulo fidentior intra limen sese facit , mox prolectante studio pulcherrimae visionis rimatur singula et altrinsecus aedium horrea sublimi fabrica perfecta magnisque congesta gazis conspicit ; nec est quicquam quod ibi non est : sed praeter ceteram tantarum divitiarum admirationem hoc erat praecipue mirificum , quod nullo vinculo , nullo claustro nullo custode totius orbis thesaurus ille muniebatur Haec ei summa cum voluptate visenti offert sese vox quaedam corporis sui nuda , et ‘Quid , inquit Domina , tantis obstupescis opibus ? Tua sunt haec omnia . prohinc cubiculo te refer , et lectulo lassitudinem refove , et ex arbitrio lavacrum pete . Nos quarum voces accipis , tuae famulae ; sedulo tibi praeministrabimus nec corporis curatae tibi regales epulae morabuntur .

3 . Sensit Psyche divinae providentiae beatitudinem monitusque , voces informes audiens , et prius somno et mox lavacro fatigationem sui diluit , visoque statim proximo semirotundo suggestu , propter instrumentum [ p . 204 ] cenatorium rata refectui suo commodum , libens accumbit . Et illico vini nectarei eduliumque variorum fercula copiosa , nullo serviente sed tantum spiritui quodam impulsa , subministrantur : nec quemquam tamen illa videre poterat , sed verba tantum audiebat excidentia et solas voces famulas habebat . Post opimas dapes quidam introcessit et cantavit invisus et alius citharam pulsavit , quae videbatur nec ipsa : tunc . modulatae multitudinis conferta vox aures eius affertur , ut , quamvis hominum nemo pareret , chorus tamen esse pateret .
Book V : 1-3 The tale of Cupid and Psyche : the palace

Psyche , pleasantly reclining in that grassy place on a bed of dew-wet grass , free of her mental perturbation , fell peacefully asleep , and when she was sufficiently refreshed by slumber , rose , feeling calm . She saw a grove planted with great , tall trees ; she saw a glittering fount of crystal water .
At the very centre of the grove beside the flowing stream was a regal palace , not made by human hands , but built by divine art . You knew from the moment you entered you were viewing the splendid shining residence of a god . There were coffered ceilings , exquisitely carved from ivory and citron-wood supported on golden pillars ; the walls were covered with relief-work in silver , wild beasts in savage herds met your gaze as you reached the doorway . They were the work of some eminent master , or a demigod or god perhaps , who with the subtlety of great art had made creatures all of silver . Even the floors were of mosaic , pictures patterned from precious stones cut into tiny tiles . Blessed twice over or more are those who tread on shining jewels and gems ! The length and breadth of the rest of the house was equally beyond price , the walls constructed of solid gold gleaming with their own brilliance , so that even without the sun’s rays the house shone like day . The rooms , the colonnades , the very doorposts glowed . And every other feature matched the house in magnificence , so you would have thought , rightly , that this was a heavenly palace made for Jove to use on his visits to the world .
Seduced by the attractions of this lovely place Psyche moved closer and , gaining confidence , dared to cross the threshold . Now her desire to gaze on all these beautiful things led her to examine every object closely . On the far side of the palace she found storerooms made with noble skill , heaped to the roof with mounds of treasure . All that existed was there . And beyond her amazement at the vast quantities of riches , she was especially startled to find not a lock , or bolt or chain to defend this treasure-house of all the world . As she looked around her , in rapturous delight , a bodiless voice spoke to her : " Lady , why are you so surprised at all this vast wealth ? All that is here is yours . So retire to your room , and ease your weariness on the bed , and when you wish you can bathe . The voices you may hear are those of your servants , we who wait on you willingly , and when your body is refreshed we will be ready with a feast . "
Psyche felt blessed by divine providence , and obeying the guidance of the disembodied voice , eased her weariness with sleep and then a bath . Nearby she found a semi-circular table , and judging from the dinner setting that it was meant for her , she promptly sat down to wait . Instantly trays loaded with food and cups of nectar appeared , without trace of servants , they were wafted and set before her as though by a breath of air . No one was visible , but words could be heard from somewhere , her waiters were merely voices . And after a sumptuous meal , someone invisible came and sang , and someone played a lyre , invisible too . And there came to her ears the interweaving melodies of some large throng , some invisible choir .
Psyche lay sweetly reclined in that soft grassy place
on a couch of herbage fresh with dew . Her wild anguish
of spirit was assuaged and she fell softly asleep . When
she had slumbered enough and was refreshed , she rose
to her feet . The tempest had passed from her soul .
She beheld a grove of huge and lofty trees , she beheld
a transparent fountain of glassy water . In the very
heart of the grove beside the gliding stream there stood
a palace , built by no human hands but by the cunning
of a god . You will perceive so soon as I have taken
you within , that it is the pleasant and luxurious dwelling
of some deity that I present to your gaze . For the
fretted roof on high was curiously carved of sandalwood
and ivory , and the columns that upheld it were of gold .
All the walls were covered with wild beasts and other
like creatures of the field , wrought in chased silver , and
confronting the gaze of those that entered . Truly he
was a wondrous wight , nay , he was some demigod , or
rather in very truth a god , that had power by the subtlety
of his matchless skill to put such wild life into silver .
The pavement was of precious stones cut small and
patterned with images of many kinds . Most surely , aye ,
again and yet again I say it , blessed are those whose
feet tread upon gems and jewels . The rest of the
house through all its length and breadth was precious eyond price . All the walls were built of solid ingots
of gold and shone with peculiar splendour , making
a daylight of their own within the house , even though the
sun should withhold his beams . Such were the lightnings
flashed from bedchamber and colonnade and from the
very doors themselves . Nor were the riches in the rest
of the house unworthy of such splendour . It seemed
a heavenly palace built by great Jove that he might
dwell with mortal men . Allured by the charm and 2
beauty of the place , Psyche drew near and , as her
confidence increased , crossed the threshold . Soon the
delight of gazing on such loveliness drew her on to
explore each several glory until at last on the farther
side of the house she beheld a lofty chamber piled
high with countless treasure . Naught may be found
in all the world that was not there . But wondrous as
was the sight of such vast wealth , yet more marvellous
was it that there was no chain nor bar nor sentinel to
guard the treasure of all the world . Deep joy filled
her at the sight , when suddenly a bodiless voice spake
to her . " Why , lady , " it said , " are you overwhelmed
at the sight of so great wealth ? All is yours . Go
now to your chamber , refresh your weariness upon your
couch , and bathe when it pleases you so to do . We ,
whose voices you hear , are your servants who will wait
upon you diligently and , when you have refreshed your
body , will straightway serve you with a royal banquet . " over her . First for a while she slept , then waking ,
bathed to refresh her weariness . This done , she beheld
hard by a couch shaped like a half-moon , and , deeming
from the dinner service spread beside it that it was
meant for her refreshment , gladly laid her down . Forth-
with she was served with wine like nectar , and many
a dish of diverse viands . Yet no man waited on her ,
but all things seemed wafted to her as it were by some
wind . Neither could she see any man , only she heard
words that fell from the air , and none save voices were
her servants . After she had feasted thus daintily , one
whom she might not see entered and sang to her , while
another struck the lyre , though never a lyre was to be
seen . Then the harmony of a multitude of musicians
was borne to her ears , so that she knew that a choir
4 was there , though no man was visible .

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Metamorphosis Project 1

Sage Rieth /
  • Created on 2018-10-11 18:58:51
  • Modified on 2018-10-15 03:48:02
  • Translated by B. Earl and H.E. Butler
  • Aligned by Sage Rieth
Latin
English
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[ 2 ] Thessaliam - nam et illic originis maternae nostrae fundamenta a Plutarcho illo inclito ac mox Sexto philosopho nepote eius prodita gloriam nobis faciunt - eam Thessaliam ex negotio petebam . Postquam ardua montium ac lubrica vallium et roscida cespitum et glebosa camporum emersi , in equo indigena peralbo vehens iam eo quoque admodum fesso , ut ipse etiam fatigationem sedentariam incessus vegetatione discuterem in pedes desilio , equi sudorem frontem curiose exfrico , auris remulceo , frenos detraho , in gradum lenem sensim proveho , quoad lassitudinis incommodum alvi solitum ac naturale praesidium eliquaret . Ac dum is ientaculum ambulatorium prata quae praeterit ore in latus detorto pronus adfectat , duobus comitum qui forte paululum processerant tertium me facio . Ac dum ausculto quid sermonibus agitarent , alter exserto cachinno : " Parce " inquit " in verba ista haec tam absurda tamque immania mentiendo . " Isto accepto sititor alioquin novitatis : " Immo vero " inquam " impertite sermonem non quidem curiosum sed qui velim scire vel cuncta vel certe plurima ; simul iugi quod insurgimus aspritudinem fabularum lepida iucunditas levigabit . "
[ 3 ] At ille qui coeperat : " Ne " inquit " istud mendacium tam verum est quam siqui velit dicere magico susurramine amnes agiles reverti , mare pigrum conligari , ventos inanimes exspirare , solem inhiberi , lunam despumari , stellas evelli , diem tolli , noctem teneri . " Tunc ego in verba fidentior : " Heus tu " inquam " qui sermonem ieceras priorem , ne pigeat te vel taedeat reliqua pertexere " , et ad alium : " Tu vero crassis auribus et obstinato corde respuis quae forsitan vere perhibeantur . Minus hercule calles pravissimis opinionibus ea putari mendacia quae vel auditu nova vel visu rudia vel certe supra captum cogitationis ardua videantur ; quae si paulo accuratius exploraris , non modo compertu evidentia verum etiam factu facilia senties .
[ 4 ] Ego denique vespera , dum polentae caseatae modico secus offulam grandiorem in convivas aemulus contruncare gestio , mollitie cibi glutinosi faucibus inhaerentis et meacula spiritus distinentis minimo minus interii . Et tamen Athenis proxime et ante Poecilen porticum isto gemino obtutu circulatorem aspexi equestrem spatham praeacutam mucrone infesto devorasse , ac mox eundem , invitamento exiguae stipis venatoriam lanceam , qua parte minatur exitium , in ima viscera condidisse . Et ecce pone lanceae ferrum , qua bacillum inversi teli ad occipitium per ingluviem subit , puer in mollitiem decorus insurgit inque flexibus tortuosis enervam et exossam saltationem explicat cum omnium qui aderamus admiratione : diceres dei medici baculo , quod ramis semiamputatis nodosum gerit , serpentem generosum lubricis amplexibus inhaerere . Sed iam cedo tu sodes , qui coeperas , fabulam remetire . Ego tibi solus haec pro isto credam , et quod ingressui primum fuerit stabulum prandio participabo . Haec tibi merces posita est . "
1 . 2
I was going to Thessaly-my mother is from Thessaly , by the way , and she ' s descended
from Plutarch , you know , the famous biographer , and not to mention his grandson , the philosopher Sextus of Chaeronea , and they made our family famous-anyways , I was on my way to Thessaly for a business trip . I surpassed the heights of the mountains , the crumbling paths of the valleys , the dewy parts of the pastures , and the clumpy furrows of the fields , riding on my native , pure-white horse . We were both exhausted , my horse and I , he from the journey and me from sitting ; so , now that we had passed through the thick vegetation , I jumped down to shake off my weariness . I carefully wiped my horse ' s sweaty forehead , stroked his ears , took off his bridle , and slowly led him at a gentle pace , until nature could restore his weary troubles and his empty belly , as it usually did . Meanwhile , he found his breakfast while we walked , leaning toward the fields we passed with his mouth turned to the side . By chance , we found ourselves walking a little ways near two companions , and I joined their little group . I listened to the conversation they were having , and one of the men , erupting with a deep guffaw , said , " That ' s enough already , what you ' re telling me is absurd , nothing but enormous lies . " Since I ' m always thirsting for such a tale-or really , for any peculiarity-I said , " Oh , come now , tell me your story . It ' s not that I ' m prying , but I ' m just the kind of guy who wants to know everything , or at least as much as I can . Not to mention , a delightful anecdote will ease our difficult climb up this big hill we ' re coming to . "

1 . 3
But the man who spoke first said , " If you told me that a whispered spell could make the swiftest rivers flow backwards , turn the sea into something too lazy to swell , force the winds to breathe out their last breath , stop the sun right in its tracks , wipe the shine off of the moon , pluck out the stars from the sky , kidnap the day , and stretch out the night-if you told me all that , I ' d believe it exactly as much as I believe those lies of yours . " More confident than before , I spoke up again . " Hey , you , " I said , pointing to the one who had already begun his story . " Don ' t get fed up or bored , finish it for me . " To the doubter , I said , " As for you , your ears are filled with mud . It ' s with a stubborn heart that you reject what very well could be true . By Hercules , you ' re not that bright to have these depraved opinions , thinking everything is a lie , even if the things sound strange to your ears , look like a heap of codswallop , or seem too lofty to grasp . If you would just look a little more carefully , you would see for yourself that not only are such things easy to find , they are even easy to do . "

1 . 4
I continued , " In fact , just last night , I was eating dinner with some co-banqueters , my gastronomic rivals . I was eager to gobble up a sort-of-largish chunk of cheesy porridge , and when the soft and sticky food stuck to my jaws and throat , I couldn ' t breathe-I nearly died . But this is nothing compared to what I saw swallowed on my recent trip to Athens . I was visiting the Poecilen colonnade , you know , outside the famous picture gallery in the market where Zeno liked to meet . I saw with my own two eyes a traveling performer swallow a very sharp broadsword , the kind cavalry would carry , tip-first ! Then , spurred onward by a small coin , the very same man swallowed a hunting spear by the end which threatened to be his ruin , burying it deep in his belly . And , right there in front of me , on top of the lance ' s hilt , where the handle of the upside-down weapon rose up through his mouth and out the back of his head , a boy ( who was quite the little princess ) climbed up and , twisting and turning , began to dance , contorting like he had no bones . Everyone there was dumbstruck . You would have said he was the noble serpent that winds itself in a slippery embrace around the staff borne by the medicine god , knotted with many half-pruned twigs . But now , if you don ' t mind , " I finished , nodding to the one who needed to finish his tale , " get on with it . Recount your story , and I alone will believe you , even if that man won ' t . And at the first tavern we come to , I ' ll buy you dinner . That ' ll be the return on your investment . "
1 . 2
I was going to Thessaly , -for my mother ' s family is sprung from that country and I am proud to say can count among its members the famous Plutarch and later his nephew , the philosopher Sextus . Well then , I was going to Thessaly on business . I had passed and left behind me steep mountain passes and slippery valley paths , dewy greensward and rich loam of plough lands , and the Thessalian horse that carried me , a beast of spotless whiteness , was exceeding weary . I too was tired of long sitting in the saddle and longed to dispel my fatigue by a brisk walk . So I leapt to the ground , carefully wiped away the sweat from my horse ' s fore- head , stroked his ears , loosened the reins , and gradually urged him to a gentle walk , until such time as nature should bring its wonted relief and remove the burden of his weariness . With head stooped to earth he broke his fast as he walked and with sidelong sweep of his mouth browsed on the fields through which he passed , while I rejoined my two comrades who had forged somewhat ahead of us . As I listened to hear of what they might be talking , one of them laughed loud and said , ' Nay ! spare us such monstrous and absurd fabrications ! ' I am always athirst for novelties , and when I heard this , I cried , ' Come now , you must admit me to your conversation . It is no mere curiosity that prompts me to make such a request , but the desire to make my knowledge complete , or at any rate as complete as may be . Besides , the charm and wit of your stories will smoothe away the difficulties of this hill we ' re climbing . '

1 . 3
Then he who had first spoken said to the other , ' Call it a lie if you will , but in good truth it is no more a lie than it would be to say that magic chants have power to make rushing rivers flow backwards , to bind the sea in sluggish calm , put breath in lifeless bodies , stay the sun in his course , draw foam from the moon , tear the stars from their places , banish the day and hold fast the darkness of night . ' This encouraged me to press my suit , and I said to him , ' Please finish the story you had begun ; do not grudge it me . There ' s no cause for reluctance . ' Then turning to the other , ' As for you , ' said I , ' you , with your dull ears and obstinate scepticism , are rejecting what may perhaps turn out to be true after all . Good heavens ! you don ' t seem to realize that it ' s mere perversity makes men think that things must needs be false because they seem strange to the hearing or new to the eyes , or at any rate far removed beyond the range of imagination . If you will only look into them a little more carefully , it ' s likely enough that you will find them not only obvious to the understanding but even easy to perform . Take an example

1 . 4
One 4 evening in the attempt to keep pace with my companions at table I hurried a little too much . I attempted to gulp down a rather large mouthful of pearl-barley flavoured with cheese and came within a hair ' s-breadth of death ; for the food , being soft and sticky , became lodged in my throat and obstructed the channels of my breath . And yet , only the other day , at Athens in front of the Painted Porch with these two eyes of mine I saw a mountebank on horseback swallow a sharp sword point foremost , and again , for the offer of a few pence , thrust a hunting-spear , its death-dealing point downwards , right into his very vitals ! And , look you , above the lance-head , where the shaft of the inverted lance rose from his open jaws toward his crown , there stood up a pretty girlish-looking boy who danced so nimbly with many a tortuous bending of his body that he seemed to have neither bone nor muscle . All we who stood by marvelled . You might have likened him to some splendid snake twining with slippery coils about the staff that the god of healing bears , all rough with knots where the twigs have been lopped away . But now come , I beg you , begin once more the story you had set forth to tell . If our friend here won ' t believe it , I will , and at the first inn we come to you shall lunch with me . That shall be your payment for the story . You have my word for it . '

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Book VIII: 19-22

Madeline McChesney /
Latin
English
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Interea quidam senex de summo colle prospectat , quem circum capellae pascentes opilionem esse profecto clamabant . Eum rogavit unus e nostris haberetne venui lactem vel adhuc liquidum vel in caseum recentem inchoatum . At ille diu capite quassanti ‘Vos autem inquit ‘De cibo vel poculo ) vel omnino ulla refectione nunc cogitatis ? An nulli scitis quo loco comederitis ? Et cum dicto conductis oviculis conversus longe recessit . Quae vox eius et fuga pastoribus nostris non mediocrem pavorem incussit : ac dum perterriti de loci qualitate sciscitari gestiunt nec est qui doceat , senex alius , magnus ille quidem , gravatus annis , totus in baculum pronus et lassum trahens vestigium , ubertim lacrimans per viam proximat , visisque nobis cum fletu maximo singulorum iuvenum genua contingens sic adorabat :
Per fortunas vestrosque genios , sic ad meae senectutis spatia validi laetique veniatis , decepto seni subsistite meumque parvulum ab inferis ereptum canis meis reddite . Nepos namque meus et itineris huius suavis comes dum forte passerem incantantem saepiculae consectatur arripere , delapsus in proxumam foveam , quae fruticibus imis subpatet , in extremo iam vitae consistit periculo , quippe cum de fletu ac voce [ p . 378 ] ipsius avum sibi saepicule clamitantis vivere illum quidem sentiam , sed per corporis , ut videtis , mei defectam valitudinem opitulari nequeam . At vobis aetatis et roboris beneficio facile est suppetiari miserrimo seni puerumque illum novissimum successionis meae atque unicam stirpem sospitem mihi facere .
Sic deprecantis suamque canitiem distrahentis totos quidem miseruit ; sed unus prae ceteris et animo fortior et aetate iuvenior et corpore validior , quique solus praeter alios incolumis proelium superius evaserat , exsurgit alacer et percontatus quonam loci puer , ille decidisset , monstrantem digito non longe frutices horridos senem illum impigre comitatur . Ac dum pabulo nostro suaque cura refecti sarcinulis quisque sumptis suis viam capessunt , clamore primum nominatim cientes illum iuvenem frequenter inclamant ; mox mora diutina commoti mittunt e suis arcessitorem unum , qui requisitum comitem tempestivae viae commonefactum reduceret . At ille modicum commoratus refert sese buxanti pallore trepidus miraque 1super conservo suo renuntiat : conspicatum se quippe supinato illi et iam ex maxima parte consumpto immanem draconem mandentem insistere nec ullum usquam miserrimum senem comparere illum . Qua re cognita et cum pastoris sermone collata , qui saevum prorsus hunc illum nec alium locorum inquilinum praeminabatur , pestilenti deserta regione velociori se fuga proripiunt . nosque pellunt
crebris tundentes fustibus . Celerrime denique longo 1 [ p . 380 ] itinere confecto pagum quendam accedimus , ibique totam perquiescimus noctem ; ubi coeptum facinus oppido memorabile narrare cupio . Servus quidam , cui cunctam familiae tutelam dominus permiserat suus , quique possessionem maximam illam , in quam deverteramus , villicabat , habens ex eodem famulitio conservam coniugam , liberae cuiusdam extrariaeque mulieris flagrabat cupidine . Quo dolore paclicatus uxor eius instricta cunctas mariti rationes et quicquid horreo reconditum continebatur admoto combussit igne . Nec tali damno tori sui contumeliam vindicasse contenta , iam contra sua saeviens viscera laqueum sibi nectit infantulumque , quem de eodem marito iamdudum susceperat , eodem funiculo nectit seque per altissimum puteum , appendicem parvulum trahens praecipitat . Quam mortem dominus eorum aegerrime sustinens arreptum servulum , qui causam tanti sceleris uxori suae praestiterat , nudum ac totum melle perlitum firmiter alligavit arbori ficulneae , cuius in ipso carioso stipite inhabitantium formicarum nidificia borribant et ultro citro commeabant multiiuga scaturigine . Quae simul dulcem ac mellitum corporis nidorem persentiscunt , parvis quidem sed numerosis et continuis morsiunculis penitus inhaerentes , per longi temporis cruciatum ita , carnibus atque ipsis visceribus adesis , homine consumpto membra nudarunt , ut ossa tantum viduata pulpis nitore nimio candentia funestae cohaererent arbori .
Now an old man appeared , gazing down on us from a summit at hand ; a goat-herd he was , as could be seen by the she-goats browsing round him . One of us asked him if he’d any milk or curds for sale . He shook his head several times before replying : ‘How can you dream of food and drink , or anything else right now ? Don’t you know where you are ? Then he gathered his goats , and made off into the distance . His words and his sudden flight filled us all with no little dread . We wondered what was wrong with the place , but there was no one the others could ask , till a second old man approached on the road , tall and bent with the years , hunched over his staff , wearily dragging his feet , and weeping copiously . Meeting with us he clasped the knees of all the young men in turn , wracked by tears .
‘May Fortune and your guardian spirits smile on you , he sobbed , ‘may you be healthy and happy when you reach my years , only help a wretched old man , save my grandson from death , and spare him to my old grey head . My sweet comrade on this journey , he was trying to catch a sparrow singing in the hedge when he fell into a pit that yawned at its feet , and now he’s doomed to death , though I know he’s alive from his calls to me , and his weeping . I’m too weak to save him , as you see , but your youth

and strength could easily aid a poor old man and save the youngest of my line , my only heir .
We were all filled with pity as he begged us to help and tore at his grey hair . One of the younger men , stouter of heart , and stronger of limb than the others , the only one of us uninjured in the recent battle , leapt up readily and asked where the boy was . The old man pointed with his finger to a clump of bushes , and the youth set off in his company . When we animals had grazed , and the humans had tended their wounds and were refreshed , we all rose with our loads and started down the road . At first they shouted and called the young man’s name repeatedly , then anxious at his delay they sent someone off to find their missing comrade , tell him we were off , and bring him back . Soon the messenger returned , trembling and pale as boxwood , with a strange tale to tell of his friend . He had seen his body he said , lying on its back , almost totally eaten by a vast serpent . The snake was coiled above him as it consumed him , but the poor old man was nowhere to be seen . Hearing this , and matching it to the goat-herd’s earlier remarks , who must have been warning them of none another than this same denizen of the place , they fled from that pestilential region , travelling more swiftly than before , driving us along rapidly with repeated blows of their sticks .
After a long day moving at breakneck pace , we came to a village where we stayed the night , a place where a noteworthy crime had been committed which I’ll relate .
A servant , whose master had made him steward of his entire estate , had previously acted as bailiff therefore of the large holding where we had stopped for the night . He was married to a servant in the same household , but burned with love for a freedwoman , who lived outside his master’s estate . Angered by her husband’s disloyalty , the wife set fire to his store- room and all his accounts , destroying both utterly . Not content with this act as revenge for the insult to her marriage , she turned her bitter rage against her own flesh . Tying a rope round her own neck and that of the child she’d just borne her husband , she hurled herself into a deep well , dragging the infant with her . Their master , horrified at their deaths , had the servant , whose infidelity had provoked the dreadful tragedy , arrested , stripped naked and smeared with honey , and tied to a rotting fig-tree inside whose trunk lived a colony of nesting ants that marched in and out in their myriad streams . Detecting the sweet sugary scent on his body , they quickly

fastened their tiny jaws in his skin , wounding him deeply with endlessly repeated bites , until after interminable torment , he died . His flesh and his innards were totally consumed and his body stripped to the bare bones which , gleaming a brilliant white , were left tied to the tree .
While they were thus engaged , each in attending to
his health , an old man spied them from the top of a
hill . The goats that fed about him showed him to be
a herdsman . One of our party asked him if he had
any milk for sale , either fresh or newly pressed into a
cheese . He shook his head repeatedly . Then ' How ' ,
he asked , ' can you think of food or drink or any other
refreshment ? Do none of you realize where you are
sitting ? ' With these words he turned and retired to
a distance , driving his sheep with him . His words
and his hasty departure struck no small terror into the
hearts of our herdsmen . And while in their fear they
strove to discover what was the matter with the place
and found none to tell them , another old man , of great
stature but bowed with years , approached along the
road , leaning heavily upon a staff and weeping floods
of tears , as he dragged his weary feet . When he saw
us he broke into loud lamentation , embraced the knees
of our young masters one after the other , and thus
entreated them :
' By the fates and guardian spirits that watch over
your ways , I implore you , help a feeble old man , save
my little grandson from the jaws of death , and restore
him to be the joy of my gray hairs . So may ye come
to such ripe years as mine , griefless and full of strength .
My grandson , my sweet companion on this journey ,
as he strove to catch a sparrow that was singing in the
hedge , fell into a pit hard by , that gapes beneath the
roots of yonder bushes and is now in extreme peril
of his life . I can hear him weeping even now and
calling his grandsire again and again to come to his
help , so that I know he still lives . But I cannot help
him , as you see , by reason of my body ' s feebleness .
But you are young and strong , and it will be easy for
you to help a poor old man and save the boy , my only
child and the last that is left me of all my heirs . '
Thus he besought them , tearing his gray hairs , and
moved them all to pity . Then one , the boldest and
youngest and sturdiest of them all , the only one more-
over who had come out of our recent conflict without
a wound , rose nimbly and asked where the boy had
fallen . The old man pointed with his finger to some
rough brambles not far off , and the youth followed him
without delay . When at last the whole party was
refreshed , ourselves with grazing and our masters with
tendance of their wounds , every one took up his load
and proceeded on the march . At first they summoned
the youth by repeated calling of his name , but soon ,
disturbed by his long tarrying , they sent one of their
number to fetch their comrade , tell him that it was
time to go , and bring him back to them . After a
short interval the messenger returned with trembling
limbs and face pale as boxwood . It was a strange
tale he had to tell of his fellow- servant . He had seen him lying on the ground while a large dragon
stood over him and gnawed his body , the greater part
of which was already consumed . The wretched old
man was nowhere to be seen . On hearing this tale
and comparing it with the words of the shepherd , they
perceived that it was against this monster and no other
inhabitant of the place that he had uttered his sinister
warning . Wherefore they left this ghastly spot and
hastened forward in flight yet more swiftly than before ,
driving us on with many a blow from their cudgels .
22 After we had covered a large distance at extraordinary
speed , we came to a village where we rested the whole
night . Now I must tell you of a very remarkable
crime that had been committed in this place .
A certain slave to whom his master had given en-
tire charge of his household , and who acted as bailiff
to the enormous estate on which we had put up for
the night , was consumed with passion for a certain
free woman of another house , although he was already
married to a fellow-slave of his own household . His
wife , in a transport of rage at his unfaithfulness , lit and
consumed with fire all her husband ' s account-books ,
together with all the valuables that the house contained .
And even this outrage seemed to her insufficient ven-
geance for so deep a wrong ; she turned her madness
against her own life , fastened a noose about