Hesiod, Works and Days, vv. 42-105

Anna Zhang /
  • Created on 2019-09-16 04:28:49
  • Modified on 2019-09-18 18:17:10
  • Aligned by Anna Zhang
English
Ἑλληνική
English
For the gods keep hidden from men the means of life . Else you would easily do work enough in a day to supply you for a full year even without working ;

soon would you put away your rudder over the smoke , and the fields worked by ox and sturdy mule would run to waste . But Zeus in the anger of his heart hid it , because Prometheus the crafty deceived him ; therefore he planned sorrow and mischief against men .

He hid fire ; but that the noble son of Iapetus stole again for men from Zeus the counsellor in a hollow fennel-stalk , so that Zeus who delights in thunder did not see it . But afterwards Zeus who gathers the clouds said to him in anger : " Son of Iapetus , surpassing all in cunning ,

you are glad that you have outwitted me and stolen fire—a great plague to you yourself and to men that shall be . But I will give men as the price for fire an evil thing in which they may all be glad of heart while they embrace their own destruction . "

So said the father of men and gods , and laughed aloud .
And he bade famous Hephaestus make haste and mix earth with water and to put in it the voice and strength of human kind , and fashion a sweet , lovely maiden-shape , like to the immortal goddesses in face ; and Athena to teach her needlework and the weaving of the varied web ;

and golden Aphrodite to shed grace upon her head and cruel longing and cares that weary the limbs . And he charged Hermes the guide , the Slayer of Argus , to put in her a shameless mind and a deceitful nature . So he ordered . And they obeyed the lord Zeus the son of Cronos .

Forthwith the famous Lame God moulded clay in the likeness of a modest maid , as the son of Cronos purposed . And the goddess brighteyed Athena girded and clothed her , and the divine Graces and queenly Persuasion put necklaces of gold upon her ,

and the rich-haired Hours crowned her head with spring flowers . And Pallas Athena bedecked her form with all manner of finery . Also the Guide , the Slayer of Argus , contrived within her lies and crafty words and a deceitful nature at the will of loud thundering Zeus ,

and the Herald of the gods put speech in her . And he called this woman Pandora , because all they who dwelt on Olympus gave each a gift , a plague to men who eat bread .

But when he had finished the sheer , hopeless snare , the Father sent glorious Argus-Slayer ,

the swift messenger of the gods , to take it to Epimetheus as a gift . And Epimetheus did not think on what Prometheus had said to him , bidding him never take a gift of Olympian Zeus , but to send it back for fear it might prove to be something harmful to men . But he took the gift , and afterwards , when the evil thing was already his , he understood .

For ere this the tribes of men lived on earth remote and free from ills and hard toil and heavy sicknesses which bring the Fates upon men ; for in misery men grow old quickly . But the woman took off the great lid of the jar with her hands

and scattered , all these and her thought caused sorrow and mischief to men . Only Hope remained there in an unbreakable home within under the rim of the great jar , and did not fly out at the door ; for ere that , the lid of the jar stopped her , by the will of Aegis-holding Zeus who gathers the clouds .

But the rest , countless plagues , wander amongst men ; for earth is full of evils , and the sea is full . Of themselves diseases come upon men continually by day and by night , bringing mischief to mortals silently ; for wise Zeus took away speech from them .

So is there no way to escape the will of Zeus .
κρύψαντες γὰρ ἔχουσι θεοὶ βίον ἀνθρώποισιν ·
ῥηιδίως γάρ κεν καὶ ἐπʼ ἤματι ἐργάσσαιο ,
ὥστε σε κεἰς ἐνιαυτὸν ἔχειν καὶ ἀεργὸν ἐόντα ·
αἶψά κε πηδάλιον μὲν ὑπὲρ καπνοῦ καταθεῖο ,
ἔργα βοῶν δʼ ἀπόλοιτο καὶ ἡμιόνων ταλαεργῶν .
ἀλλὰ Ζεὺς ἔκρυψε χολωσάμενος φρεσὶν ᾗσιν ,

ὅττι μιν ἐξαπάτησε Προμηθεὺς ἀγκυλομήτης ·
τοὔνεκʼ ἄρʼ ἀνθρώποισιν ἐμήσατο κήδεα λυγρά .
κρύψε δὲ πῦρ · τὸ μὲν αὖτις ἐὺς πάις Ἰαπετοῖο
ἔκλεψʼ ἀνθρώποισι Διὸς πάρα μητιόεντος
ἐν κοῒλῳ νάρθηκι λαθὼν Δία τερπικέραυνον .

τὸν δὲ χολωσάμενος προσέφη νεφεληγερέτα Ζευς ·
Ἰαπετιονίδη , πάντων πέρι μήδεα εἰδώς ,
χαίρεις πῦρ κλέψας καὶ ἐμὰς φρένας ἠπεροπεύσας ,
σοί τʼ αὐτῷ μέγα πῆμα καὶ ἀνδράσιν ἐσσομένοισιν .
τοῖς δʼ ἐγὼ ἀντὶ πυρὸς δώσω κακόν , κεν ἅπαντες

τέρπωνται κατὰ θυμὸν ἑὸν κακὸν ἀμφαγαπῶντες .
ὣς ἔφατʼ · ἐκ δʼ ἐγέλασσε πατὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε .
Ἥφαιστον δʼ ἐκέλευσε περικλυτὸν ὅττι τάχιστα
γαῖαν ὕδει φύρειν , ἐν δʼ ἀνθρώπου θέμεν αὐδὴν
καὶ σθένος , ἀθανάτῃς δὲ θεῇς εἰς ὦπα ἐίσκειν

παρθενικῆς καλὸν εἶδος ἐπήρατον · αὐτὰρ Ἀθήνην
ἔργα διδασκῆσαι , πολυδαίδαλον ἱστὸν ὑφαίνειν ·
καὶ χάριν ἀμφιχέαι κεφαλῇ χρυσέην Ἀφροδίτην
καὶ πόθον ἀργαλέον καὶ γυιοβόρους μελεδώνας ·
ἐν δὲ θέμεν κύνεόν τε νόον καὶ ἐπίκλοπον ἦθος

Ἑρμείην ἤνωγε , διάκτορον Ἀργεϊφόντην .
ὣς ἔφαθʼ · οἳ δʼ ἐπίθοντο Διὶ Κρονίωνι ἄνακτι .
αὐτίκα δʼ ἐκ γαίης πλάσσεν κλυτὸς Ἀμφιγυήεις
παρθένῳ αἰδοίῃ ἴκελον Κρονίδεω διὰ βουλάς ·
ζῶσε δὲ καὶ κόσμησε θεὰ γλαυκῶπις Ἀθήνη ·

ἀμφὶ δέ οἱ Χάριτές τε θεαὶ καὶ πότνια Πειθὼ
ὅρμους χρυσείους ἔθεσαν χροΐ · ἀμφὶ δὲ τήν γε
Ὧραι καλλίκομοι στέφον ἄνθεσιν εἰαρινοῖσιν ·
πάντα δέ οἱ χροῒ κόσμον ἐφήρμοσε Παλλὰς Ἀθήνη .
ἐν δʼ ἄρα οἱ στήθεσσι διάκτορος Ἀργεϊφόντης

ψεύδεά θʼ αἱμυλίους τε λόγους καὶ ἐπίκλοπον ἦθος
τεῦξε Διὸς βουλῇσι βαρυκτύπου · ἐν δʼ ἄρα φωνὴν
θῆκε θεῶν κῆρυξ , ὀνόμηνε δὲ τήνδε γυναῖκα
Πανδώρην , ὅτι πάντες Ὀλύμπια δώματʼ ἔχοντες
δῶρον ἐδώρησαν , πῆμʼ ἀνδράσιν ἀλφηστῇσιν .

αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ δόλον αἰπὺν ἀμήχανον ἐξετέλεσσεν ,
εἰς Ἐπιμηθέα πέμπε πατὴρ κλυτὸν Ἀργεϊφόντην
δῶρον ἄγοντα , θεῶν ταχὺν ἄγγελον · οὐδʼ Ἐπιμηθεὺς
ἐφράσαθʼ , ὥς οἱ ἔειπε Προμηθεὺς μή ποτε δῶρον
δέξασθαι πὰρ Ζηνὸς Ὀλυμπίου , ἀλλʼ ἀποπέμπειν

ἐξοπίσω , μή πού τι κακὸν θνητοῖσι γένηται .
αὐτὰρ δεξάμενος , ὅτε δὴ κακὸν εἶχʼ , ἐνόησεν .
Πρὶν μὲν γὰρ ζώεσκον ἐπὶ χθονὶ φῦλʼ ἀνθρώπων
νόσφιν ἄτερ τε κακῶν καὶ ἄτερ χαλεποῖο πόνοιο
νούσων τʼ ἀργαλέων , αἵ τʼ ἀνδράσι Κῆρας ἔδωκαν .

αἶψα γὰρ ἐν κακότητι βροτοὶ καταγηράσκουσιν .
ἀλλὰ γυνὴ χείρεσσι πίθου μέγα πῶμʼ ἀφελοῦσα
ἐσκέδασʼ · ἀνθρώποισι δʼ ἐμήσατο κήδεα λυγρά .
μούνη δʼ αὐτόθι Ἐλπὶς ἐν ἀρρήκτοισι δόμοισιν
ἔνδον ἔμιμνε πίθου ὑπὸ χείλεσιν , οὐδὲ θύραζε

ἐξέπτη · πρόσθεν γὰρ ἐπέλλαβε πῶμα πίθοιο
αἰγιόχου βουλῇσι Διὸς νεφεληγερέταο .
ἄλλα δὲ μυρία λυγρὰ κατʼ ἀνθρώπους ἀλάληται ·
πλείη μὲν γὰρ γαῖα κακῶν , πλείη δὲ θάλασσα ·
νοῦσοι δʼ ἀνθρώποισιν ἐφʼ ἡμέρῃ , αἳ δʼ ἐπὶ νυκτὶ

αὐτόματοι φοιτῶσι κακὰ θνητοῖσι φέρουσαι
σιγῇ , ἐπεὶ φωνὴν ἐξείλετο μητίετα Ζεύς .
οὕτως οὔτι πη ἔστι Διὸς νόον ἐξαλέασθαι .
For the gods hid and kept sustenance from people . For [ before this time ] you would easily accomplish even in one single day so as to have enough even for a full year , even if you were an idler . Quickly would you put away the steering oar up in the smoke , and the works of the oxen and the working-enduing asses would disappear . But zeus hid it , struck with anger in his chest because Prometheus of crooked counsel had deceived him . For that very reason he contrived pernicious woes for people . He hid fire . In turn the mighty son of Iapetus stole it back for people , from Zeus the Planner , in a hollow fennel stalk , escaping the notice of Zeus who delights in the thunderbolt . Struck with anger , Zeus the Cloud-Gatherer said to him : " Son of Iapetus , who know how to contrive above all others , you rejoice that you have stolen fire and cheated me in my chest , a great disaster for you yourself and also for men in the future . In return for fire , I will give them an evil thing , in which they may all delight in spirit as they embrace their evil . "
So he spoke , and the father of men and gods laughed out loud . He ordered the renowned Hephaestus to mix earth with water as quickly as he could , and to put into it human speech and strength , and to make a desirable , fair appearance of a virgin like the deathless goddess in face ; then he ordered Athena to teach her her works , to weave on the elegant loom . And golden Aphrodite he ordered to pour on her head charm and painful yearning and limb-devouring cares . And he commanded Hermes , the messenger Dog-Killer , to put in her a dog’s thinking and a deceitful character .
So he spoke , and they obeyed the lord Zeus , the son of Cronus . Straightway the famous Craftsman molded out of earth something resembling a revered virgin , in accordance with the plans of the son of Cronus . The goddess gleaming-eyed Athena girdled and adorned her ; the goddess Graces and lady Persuasion put golden necklaces on her skin ; around her the fair-haired Seasons crowned her with spring blooms : Pallas Athena fitted the entire adornment to her skin . Then in her breast the messenger Dog-killer molded lies and wheedling words , and a deceitful character , according to the plans of zeus the Heavy-Thunderer . Then in her the herald of the gods put a voice , and he named this woman Pandora because all those who have Olympian homes gave her as a gift : she was a disaster for bread-eating men .
But when he had fully brought about the sheer , ineluctable ruse , the father dispatched the famous Dog-Killer , swift envoy of the gods , bearing the gift into Epimetheus’s home ; and Epimetheus did not consider that Prometheus had told him never to accept a gift from Olympian Zeus , but to send it back again , lest somehow it turn out to be something evil for mortals . Then the receiver , just as he took hold of the evil , realized it .
For previously groups of people lived on the ground , apart from and without evils and without hard toil and painful diseases , which give dooms to men . But women removed with her hands the jar’s great lid and scattered the evils ; she contrived pernicious woes for people . Expectation alone remained there in her unbreakable home inside , under the jar’s lips , and did not fly out , for Pandora had already thrown the jar’s lid back on , according to the plans of Zeus the Aegis-Mover and Cloud-Gatherer . Countless other pernicious things roam among people , for the earth is full of evils , and the sea is full . There are diseases for people during the day , and others in the night that wander under their own power , bringing evils to mortals secretly because Zeus the Planner took out their voice . Thus there is no way at all to avoid the purpose of Zeus .

( 587 ) 81% ENG
( 142 ) 19% ENG - GRC

( 90 ) 18% ENG - GRC
( 412 ) 82% GRC

( 90 ) 18% ENG - GRC
( 412 ) 82% GRC

Nomes próprios Hesíodo-Teogonia

Allan Pradella /
Ἑλληνική
Português
français
Ἥβη
Ἀθηνᾶ
Ἀπόλλων
Ἄρτεμις
Ἀφροδίτη
Διώνη
Ἑλικῶνι
Ζεύς
ἥλιος
Ἥρα
Ἡσίοδος
Κρόνος
Μοῦσαι
Νύξ
Ὀλμειοῦ
Ποσειδῶν
Σελήνην
Ὠκεανός
Ὕλη
Ἀλκμήνης
Ἄρης
Ἀμφιγυήεις
Ἐννοσίγαιος
Ἐρινύς
Ψαμάθη
Δῖος
Πρωτώ
Δωτώ
Δυναμένη
Κοῖος
Φοίβη
Νημερτής
Ἀκταίη
Ἀγαυή
Ἁλίη ; Ἁλία
Πανόπεια
Περσηίς
Ἀκάστη
Ῥόδειά
Γαλάτεια
Γλαύκη
Δυναμένη
Δωρίς
Δωτώ
Θάλεια
Θόη
Δυναμένη
Ἰάνειρα
Κλυμένη
Κυμοδόκη
Κυμοθόη
Μελίτη
Πρωτώ
Σπειώ
Φέρουσα
Γαῖα
Θάλεια
Hebe
Atena
Apolo
Ártemis
Afrodite
Dione
Hélicon
Zeus
Hélio
Hera
Hesíodo
Crono
Musas
Noite
Olmeu
Posídon
Selene
Oceano
Hile
Alcmena
Ares
epith . of Hephaestus
Nome de Posídon , Treme Terra .
Erínias
Psâmate
Zeus
Proto
Doto
Dinâmene
Céos
Febe
Nemertes
Acteia
Agave
Halia ; Halie
Panopéia
Perseide
Acaste
Rhodeia
Galateia
Glauce
Dinâmene
Dóris
Doto
Talia
Toe
Dinamene
Ianeira ( Ianira )
Clímene
Cimódoce ( Cimodoceia )
Cimótoe
Mélite
Proto
Espio
Ferusa
Gaia
Talia
Hébé
Athèna
Apollon
Artémis
Aphroditè
Diônè
Hélikôn
Zeus
Hélios
Hèra
Hésiode
Kronos
Muses
Nuit
Olmius
Poseidôn
Sélènè
Okéanos
Hylè
Alcmène
Arès


Erinyes
Psamathe
Zeus
Proto
Dótò
Dynaménè
kœos
Phœbè
Nèmertès
Actaeé
Agauè
Halia ; Haliè
Panopé
Perseis
Acaste
Rhodeia
Galateia ( Galatée )
Glaukè
Dynaménè
Dôris
Dótò
Thaleia ( Thalie )
Thoè
Dynamène
Ianeira
Klyménè ( Clymène )
Kymodokè
Kymothoè
Mélitè
Proto
Spéio
Phérousa
Gaea
Thaleia

( 2 ) 3% GRC
( 57 ) 97% GRC - POR

( 62 ) 84% GRC - POR
( 12 ) 16% POR

( 62 ) 84% GRC - POR
( 12 ) 16% POR

Happiness

Jimmy Harrington /
  • Created on 2019-09-13 17:31:35
  • Modified on 2019-09-18 16:58:14
  • Aligned by Jimmy Harrington
Ἑλληνική
English
English
Μήτε νέος τις ὢν μελλέτω φιλοσοφεῖν , μήτε γέρων ὑπάρχων κοπιάτω φιλοσοφῶν . οὔτε γὰρ ἄωρος οὐδείς ἐστιν οὔτε πάρωρος πρὸς τὸ κατὰ ψυχὴν ὑγιαῖνον . δὲ λέγων μήπω τοῦ φιλοσοφεῖν ὑπάρχειν ὥραν ἢ παρεληλυθέναι τὴν ὥραν ὅμοιός ἐστι τῶι λέγοντι πρὸς εὐδαιμονίαν μὴ παρεῖναι τὴν ὥραν μηκέτι εἶναι . ὥστε φιλοσοφητέον καὶ νέωι καὶ γέροντι , τῶι μὲν ὅπως γηράσκων νεάζηι τοῖς ἀγαθοῖς διὰ τὴν χάριν τῶν γεγονότων , τῶι δὲ ὅπως νέος ἅμα καὶ παλαιὸς ἦι διὰ τὴν ἀφοβίαν τῶν μελλόντων · μελετᾶν οὖν χρὴ τὰ ποιοῦντα τὴν εὐδαιμονίαν , εἴπερ παρούσης μὲν αὐτῆς πάντα ἔχομεν , ἀπούσης δὲ πάντα πράττομεν εἰς τὸ ταύτην ἔχειν . 
Ἃ δέ σοι συνεχῶς παρήγγελλον , ταῦτα καὶ πρᾶττε καὶ μελέτα , στοιχεῖα τοῦ καλῶς ζῆν ταῦτ ' εἶναι διαλαμβάνων . Πρῶτον μὲν τὸν θεὸν ζῶιον ἄφθαρτον καὶ μακάριον νομίζων , ὡς κοινὴ τοῦ θεοῦ νόησις ὑπεγράφη , μηθὲν μήτε τῆς ἀφθαρσίας ἀλλότριον μήτε τῆς μακαριότητος ἀνοίκειον αὐτῶι πρόσαπτε · πᾶν δὲ τὸ φυλάττειν αὐτοῦ δυνάμενον τὴν μετὰ ἀφθαρσίας μακαριότητα περὶ αὐτὸν δόξαζε . θεοὶ μὲν γὰρ εἰσίν · ἐναργὴς γὰρ αὐτῶν ἐστιν γνῶσις · οἵους δ ' αὐτοὺς ‹οἱ› πολλοὶ νομίζουσιν , οὐκ εἰσίν · οὐ γὰρ φυλάττουσιν αὐτοὺς οἵους νομίζουσιν . ἀσεβὴς δὲ οὐχ τοὺς τῶν πολλῶν θεοὺς ἀναιρῶν , ἀλλ ' τὰς τῶν πολλῶν δόξας θεοῖς προσάπτων . οὐ γὰρ προλήψεις εἰσὶν ἀλλ ' ὑπολήψεις ψευδεῖς αἱ τῶν πολλῶν ὑπὲρ θεῶν ἀποφάσεις . ἔνθεν αἱ μέγισται βλάβαι ἐκ θεῶν ἐπάγονται καὶ ὠφέλειαι ‹τοῖς ἀγαθοῖς› . ταῖς γὰρ ἰδίαις οἰκειούμενοι διὰ παντὸς ἀρεταῖς τοὺς ὁμοίους ἀποδέχονται , πᾶν τὸ μὴ τοιοῦτον ὡς ἀλλότριον νομίζοντες . 
Συνέθιζε δὲ ἐν τῶι νομίζειν μηδὲν πρὸς ἡμᾶς εἶναι τὸν θάνατον ἐπεὶ πᾶν ἀγαθὸν καὶ κακὸν ἐν αἰσθήσει · στέρησις δέ ἐστιν αἰσθήσεως θάνατος . ὅθεν γνῶσις ὀρθὴ τοῦ μηθὲν εἶναι πρὸς ἡμᾶς τὸν θάνατον ἀπολαυστὸν ποιεῖ τὸ τῆς ζωῆς θνητόν , οὐκ ἄπειρον προστιθεῖσα χρόνον , ἀλλὰ τὸν τῆς ἀθανασίας ἀφελομένη πόθον . οὐθὲν γάρ ἐστιν ἐν τῶι ζῆν δεινὸν τῶι κατειληφότι γνησίως τὸ μηδὲν ὑπάρχειν ἐν τῶι μὴ ζῆν δεινόν . ὥστε μάταιος λέγων δεδιέναι τὸν θάνατον οὐχ ὅτι λυπήσει παρών , ἀλλ ' ὅτι λυπεῖ μέλλων . γὰρ παρὸν οὐκ ἐνοχλεῖ , προσδοκώμενον κενῶς λυπεῖ . τὸ φρικωδέστατον οὖν τῶν κακῶν θάνατος οὐθὲν πρὸς ἡμᾶς , ἐπειδήπερ ὅταν μὲν ἡμεῖς ὦμεν , θάνατος οὐ πάρεστιν , ὅταν δὲ θάνατος παρῆι , τόθ ' ἡμεῖς οὐκ ἐσμέν . οὔτε οὖν πρὸς τοὺς ζῶντάς ἐστιν οὔτε πρὸς τοὺς τετελευτηκότας , ἐπειδήπερ περὶ οὓς μὲν οὐκ ἔστιν , οἳ δ ' οὐκέτι εἰσίν . Ἀλλ ' οἱ πολλοὶ τὸν θάνατον ὁτὲ μὲν ὡς μέγιστον τῶν κακῶν φεύγουσιν , ὁτὲ δὲ ὡς ἀνάπαυσιν τῶν ἐν τῶι ζῆν ‹κακῶν αἱροῦνται . δὲ σοφὸς οὔτε παραιτεῖται τὸ ζῆν› οὔτε φοβεῖται τὸ μὴ ζῆν · οὔτε γὰρ αὐτῶι προσίσταται τὸ ζῆν οὔτε δοξάζεται κακὸν εἶναί τι τὸ μὴ ζῆν . ὥσπερ δὲ τὸ σιτίον οὐ τὸ πλεῖον πάντως ἀλλὰ τὸ ἥδιστον αἱρεῖται , οὕτω καὶ χρόνον οὐ τὸν μήκιστον ἀλλὰ τὸν ἥδιστον καρπίζεται . δὲ παραγγέλλων τὸν μὲν νέον καλῶς ζῆν , τὸν δὲ γέροντα καλῶς καταστρέφειν , εὐήθης ἐστὶν οὐ μόνον διὰ τὸ τῆς ζωῆς ἀσπαστόν , ἀλλὰ καὶ διὰ τὸ τὴν αὐτὴν εἶναι μελέτην τοῦ καλῶς ζῆν καὶ τοῦ καλῶς ἀποθνῄσκειν . πολὺ δὲ χείρων καὶ λέγων καλὸν μὲν μὴ φῦναι , 
φύντα δ ' ὅπως ὤκιστα πύλας Ἀίδαο περῆσαι .
Let no one delay the study of philosophy while young nor weary
of it when old . For no one is either too young or too old for the health of
the soul . He who says either that the time for philosophy has not yet
come or that it has passed is like someone who says that the time for
happiness has not yet come or that it has passed . Therefore , both young
and old must philosophize , the latter so that although old he may stay
young in good things owing to gratitude for what has occurred , the
former so that although young he too may be like an old man owing to his
lack of fear of what is to come . Therefore , one must practise the things
which produce happiness , since if that is present we have everything and
if it is absent we do everything in order to have it
Do and practise what I constantly told you to do , believing these
to be the elements of living well . First , believe that god is an indestruct
-
ible and blessed animal , in accordance with the general conception of god
commonly held , and do not ascribe to god anything foreign to his inde
-
structibility or repugnant to his blessedness . Believe of him everything
which is able to preserve his blessedness and indestructibility . For gods
do exist , since we have clear knowledge of them . But they are not such as
the many believe them to be . For they do not adhere to their own views
about the gods . The man who denies the gods of the many is not impi
The extant letters
ous , but rather he who ascribes to the gods the opinions of the many .
For the pronouncements of the many about the gods are not basic
grasps but false suppositions . Hence come the greatest harm from
the gods to bad men and the greatest benefits [ to the good ] . For the
gods always welcome men who are like themselves , being congenial
to their own virtues and considering that whatever is not such is uncongenial .
Get used to believing that death is nothing to us . For all good and
bad consists in sense-experience , and death is the privation of sense-
experience . Hence , a correct knowledge of the fact that death is nothing
to us makes the mortality of life a matter for contentment , not by adding
a limitless time [ to life ] but by removing the longing for immortality .
For there is nothing fearful in life for one who has grasped that there is
nothing fearful in the absence of life . Thus , he is a fool who says that he
fears death not because it will be painful when present but because it
is painful when it is still to come . For that which while present causes no
distress causes unnecessary pain when merely anticipated . So death ,
the most frightening of bad things , is nothing to us ; since when we exist ,
death is not yet present , and when death is present , then we do not exist .
Therefore , it is relevant neither to the living nor to the dead , since it does
not affect the former , and the latter do not exist . But the many sometimes
flee death as the greatest of bad things and sometimes choose it as a
relief from the bad things in life .
Let no one delay in the study of philosophy while he is young , and when he is old , let him not become weary of the study . For no man can ever find the time unsuitable or too late to study the health of his soul .

And he who asserts either that it is too soon to study philosophy , or that the hour is passed , is like a man who would say that the time has not yet come to be happy , or that it is too late to be happy .

So both the young and the old must study philosophy that as one grows old he may be young in the blessings that come from the grateful recollection of those good things that have passed , and that even in youth he may have the wisdom of age , since he will know no fear of what is to come . It is necessary for us , then , to meditate on the things which produce happiness , since if happiness is present we have everything , and when happiness is absent we do everything with a view to possess it .

Now , I will repeat to you those things that I have constantly recommended to you , and I would have you do and practice them , as they are the elements of living well :

First of all , believe that a god is an incorruptible and happy being , just as Nature has commonly implanted the notion in the minds of men . But attach to your theology nothing which is inconsistent with incorruptibility or with happiness , and believe that a god possesses everything which is necessary to preserve its own nature .

Indeed the gods do exist , and Nature gives to us a degree of knowledge of them . But gods are not of the character which most people attribute to them , and the conception of the gods held by most people is far from pure . It is not the man who discards the gods believed in by the many who is impious , but he who applies to the gods the false opinions that most people entertain about them . For the assertions of most people about the gods are not true intuitions given to them by Nature , but false opinions of their own , such as the idea that gods send misfortune to the wicked and blessings to the good . False opinions such as these arise because men think of the gods as if they had human qualities , and men do not understand that the gods have virtues that are different from their own .

Next , accustom yourself to think that death is a matter with which we are not at all concerned . This is because all good and all evil come to us through sensation , and death brings the end of all our sensations . The correct understanding that death is no concern of ours allows us to take pleasure in our mortal lives , not because it adds to life an infinite span of time , but because it relieves us of the longing for immortality as a refuge from the fear of death . For there can be nothing terrible in living for a man who rightly comprehends that there is nothing terrible in ceasing to live

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( 29 ) 5% GRC - ENG
( 579 ) 95% ENG

( 29 ) 5% GRC - ENG
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Euripides' Bacchae

Patrick Lyle /
  • Created on 2019-09-11 18:13:17
  • Modified on 2019-09-18 17:28:41
  • Translated by Buckley; MIT Classics
  • Aligned by Patrick Lyle
English
Ἑλληνική
English
Pentheus
Release his hands , for caught in the nets he is not so swift as to escape me . But your body is not ill-formed , stranger , for women ' s purposes , for which reason you have come to Thebes . [ 455 ] For your hair is long , not through wrestling , scattered over your cheeks , full of desire ; and you have a white skin from careful preparation , hunting after Aphrodite by your beauty not exposed to strokes of the sun , but beneath the shade . [ 460 ] First then tell me who your family is .

Dionysus
I can tell you this easily , without boasting . I suppose you are familiar with flowery Tmolus .

Pentheus
I know of it ; it surrounds the city of Sardis .

Dionysus
I am from there , and Lydia is my fatherland .

Pentheus
[ 465 ] Why do you bring these rites to Hellas ?

Dionysus
Dionysus , the child of Zeus , sent me .

Pentheus
Is there a Zeus who breeds new gods there ?

Dionysus
No , but the one who married Semele here .

Pentheus
Did he compel you at night , or in your sight ?

Dionysus
[ 470 ] Seeing me just as I saw him , he gave me sacred rites .

Pentheus
What appearance do your rites have ?

Dionysus
They can not be told to mortals uninitiated in Bacchic revelry .

Pentheus
And do they have any profit to those who sacrifice ?

Dionysus
It is not lawful for you to hear , but they are worth knowing .

Pentheus
[ 475 ] You have counterfeited this well , so that I desire to hear .

Dionysus
The rites are hostile to whoever practices impiety .

Pentheus
Are you saying that you saw clearly what the god was like ?

Dionysus
He was as he chose ; I did not order this .

Pentheus
Again you diverted my question well , speaking mere nonsense .

Dionysus
[ 480 ] One will seem to be foolish if he speaks wisely to an ignorant man .

Pentheus
Did you come here first , bringing the god ?

Dionysus
All the barbarians celebrate these rites .

Pentheus
Yes , for they are far more foolish than Hellenes .

Dionysus
In this at any rate they are wiser ; but their laws are different .

Pentheus
[ 485 ] Do you perform the rites by night or by day ?

Dionysus
Mostly by night ; darkness conveys awe .

Pentheus
This is treacherous towards women , and unsound .

Dionysus
Even during the day someone may devise what is shameful .

Pentheus
You must pay the penalty for your evil contrivances .

Dionysus
[ 490 ] And you for your ignorance and impiety toward the god .

Pentheus
How bold the Bacchant is , and not unpracticed in speaking !

Dionysus
Tell me what I must suffer ; what harm will you do to me ?

Pentheus
First I will cut off your delicate hair .

Dionysus
My hair is sacred . I am growing it for the god .

Pentheus
[ 495 ] Next give me this thyrsos from your hands .

Dionysus
Take it from me yourself . I bear it as the ensign of Dionysus .

Pentheus
We will guard your body within , in prison .

Dionysus
The god himself will release me , whenever I want .

Pentheus
Yes , when you call him , standing among the Bacchae .

Dionysus
[ 500 ] Even now he see my sufferings from close by .

Pentheus
Where is he ? He is not visible to my eyes .

Dionysus
Near me ; but you , being impious , do not see him .

Pentheus
To attendants
Seize him ; he insults me and Thebes !

Dionysus
I warn you not to bind me , since I am in my senses and you are not .

Pentheus
[ 505 ] And I , more masterful than you , bid them to bind you .

Dionysus
You do not know why you live , or what you are doing , or who you are .

Pentheus
I am Pentheus , son of Echion and Agave .

Dionysus
You are well-suited to be miserable in your name . 1

Pentheus
Go .

To attendants
Shut him up near the horse [ 510 ] stable , so that he may see only darkness .

To Dionysus
Dance there ; and as for these women whom you have led here as accomplices to your crimes , we will either sell them or , stopping their hands from this noise and beating of skins , I will keep them as slaves at the loom .

Dionysus
[ 515 ] I will go , for I need not suffer that which is not necessary . But Dionysus , who you claim does not exist , will pursue you for these insults . For in injuring us , you put him in bonds .
Πενθεύς
μέθεσθε χειρῶν τοῦδʼ · ἐν ἄρκυσιν γὰρ ὢν οὐκ ἔστιν οὕτως ὠκὺς ὥστε μʼ ἐκφυγεῖν . ἀτὰρ τὸ μὲν σῶμʼ οὐκ ἄμορφος εἶ , ξένε , ὡς ἐς γυναῖκας , ἐφʼ ὅπερ ἐς Θήβας πάρει · πλόκαμός τε γάρ σου ταναός , οὐ πάλης ὕπο , γένυν παρʼ αὐτὴν κεχυμένος , πόθου πλέως · λευκὴν δὲ χροιὰν ἐκ παρασκευῆς ἔχεις , οὐχ ἡλίου βολαῖσιν , ἀλλʼ ὑπὸ σκιᾶς , τὴν Ἀφροδίτην καλλονῇ θηρώμενος . πρῶτον μὲν οὖν μοι λέξον ὅστις εἶ γένος .

Διόνυσος
οὐ κόμπος οὐδείς · ῥᾴδιον δʼ εἰπεῖν τόδε . τὸν ἀνθεμώδη Τμῶλον οἶσθά που κλύων .

Πενθεύς
οἶδʼ , ὃς τὸ Σάρδεων ἄστυ περιβάλλει κύκλῳ .

Διόνυσος
ἐντεῦθέν εἰμι , Λυδία δέ μοι πατρίς .

Πενθεύς
πόθεν δὲ τελετὰς τάσδʼ ἄγεις ἐς Ἑλλάδα ;

Διόνυσος
Διόνυσος ἡμᾶς εἰσέβησʼ , τοῦ Διός .

Πενθεύς
Ζεὺς δʼ ἔστʼ ἐκεῖ τις , ὃς νέους τίκτει θεούς ;

Διόνυσος
οὔκ , ἀλλʼ Σεμέλην ἐνθάδε ζεύξας γάμοις .

Πενθεύς
πότερα δὲ νύκτωρ σʼ κατʼ ὄμμʼ ἠνάγκασεν ;

Διόνυσος
ὁρῶν ὁρῶντα , καὶ δίδωσιν ὄργια .

Πενθεύς
τὰ δʼ ὄργιʼ ἐστὶ τίνʼ ἰδέαν ἔχοντά σοι ;

Διόνυσος
ἄρρητʼ ἀβακχεύτοισιν εἰδέναι βροτῶν .

Πενθεύς
ἔχει δʼ ὄνησιν τοῖσι θύουσιν τίνα ;

Διόνυσος
οὐ θέμις ἀκοῦσαί σʼ , ἔστι δʼ ἄξιʼ εἰδέναι .

Πενθεύς
εὖ τοῦτʼ ἐκιβδήλευσας , ἵνʼ ἀκοῦσαι θέλω .

Διόνυσος
ἀσέβειαν ἀσκοῦντʼ ὄργιʼ ἐχθαίρει θεοῦ .

Πενθεύς
τὸν θεὸν ὁρᾶν γὰρ φῂς σαφῶς , ποῖός τις ἦν ;

Διόνυσος
ὁποῖος ἤθελʼ · οὐκ ἐγὼ ʼτασσον τόδε .

Πενθεύς
τοῦτʼ αὖ παρωχέτευσας εὖ κοὐδὲν λέγων .

Διόνυσος
δόξει τις ἀμαθεῖ σοφὰ λέγων οὐκ εὖ φρονεῖν .

Πενθεύς
ἦλθες δὲ πρῶτα δεῦρʼ ἄγων τὸν δαίμονα ;

Διόνυσος
πᾶς ἀναχορεύει βαρβάρων τάδʼ ὄργια .

Πενθεύς
φρονοῦσι γὰρ κάκιον Ἑλλήνων πολύ .

Διόνυσος
τάδʼ εὖ γε μᾶλλον · οἱ νόμοι δὲ διάφοροι .

Πενθεύς
τὰ δʼ ἱερὰ νύκτωρ μεθʼ ἡμέραν τελεῖς ;

Διόνυσος
νύκτωρ τὰ πολλά · σεμνότητʼ ἔχει σκότος .

Πενθεύς
τοῦτʼ ἐς γυναῖκας δόλιόν ἐστι καὶ σαθρόν .

Διόνυσος
κἀν ἡμέρᾳ τό γʼ αἰσχρὸν ἐξεύροι τις ἄν .

Πενθεύς
δίκην σε δοῦναι δεῖ σοφισμάτων κακῶν .

Διόνυσος
σὲ δʼ ἀμαθίας γε κἀσεβοῦντʼ ἐς τὸν θεόν .

Πενθεύς
ὡς θρασὺς βάκχος κοὐκ ἀγύμναστος λόγων .

Διόνυσος
εἴφʼ τι παθεῖν δεῖ · τί με τὸ δεινὸν ἐργάσῃ ;

Πενθεύς
πρῶτον μὲν ἁβρὸν βόστρυχον τεμῶ σέθεν .

Διόνυσος
ἱερὸς πλόκαμος · τῷ θεῷ δʼ αὐτὸν τρέφω .

Πενθεύς
ἔπειτα θύρσον τόνδε παράδος ἐκ χεροῖν .

Διόνυσος
αὐτός μʼ ἀφαιροῦ · τόνδε Διονύσου φορῶ .

Πενθεύς
εἱρκταῖσί τʼ ἔνδον σῶμα σὸν φυλάξομεν .

Διόνυσος
λύσει μʼ δαίμων αὐτός , ὅταν ἐγὼ θέλω .

Πενθεύς
ὅταν γε καλέσῃς αὐτὸν ἐν βάκχαις σταθείς .

Διόνυσος
καὶ νῦν πάσχω πλησίον παρὼν ὁρᾷ .

Πενθεύς
καὶ ποῦ ʼστιν ; οὐ γὰρ φανερὸς ὄμμασίν γʼ ἐμοῖς .

Διόνυσος
παρʼ ἐμοί · σὺ δʼ ἀσεβὴς αὐτὸς ὢν οὐκ εἰσορᾷς .

Πενθεύς
λάζυσθε · καταφρονεῖ με καὶ Θήβας ὅδε .

Διόνυσος
αὐδῶ με μὴ δεῖν σωφρονῶν οὐ σώφροσιν .

Πενθεύς
ἐγὼ δὲ δεῖν γε , κυριώτερος σέθεν .

Διόνυσος
οὐκ οἶσθʼ τι ζῇς , οὐδʼ δρᾷς , οὐδʼ ὅστις εἶ .

Πενθεύς
Πενθεύς , Ἀγαύης παῖς , πατρὸς δʼ Ἐχίονος .

Διόνυσος
ἐνδυστυχῆσαι τοὔνομʼ ἐπιτήδειος εἶ .

Πενθεύς
χώρει · καθείρξατʼ αὐτὸν ἱππικαῖς πέλας φάτναισιν , ὡς ἂν σκότιον εἰσορᾷ κνέφας . ἐκεῖ χόρευε · τάσδε δʼ ἃς ἄγων πάρει κακῶν συνεργοὺς διεμπολήσομεν χεῖρα δούπου τοῦδε καὶ βύρσης κτύπου παύσας , ἐφʼ ἱστοῖς δμωίδας κεκτήσομαι .

Διόνυσος
στείχοιμʼ ἄν · τι γὰρ μὴ χρεών , οὔτοι χρεὼν παθεῖν . ἀτάρ τοι τῶνδʼ ἄποινʼ ὑβρισμάτων μέτεισι Διόνυσός σʼ , ὃν οὐκ εἶναι λέγεις · ἡμᾶς γὰρ ἀδικῶν κεῖνον εἰς δεσμοὺς ἄγεις .
PENTHEUS
Loose his hands ; for now that I have him in the net he is scarce swift enough to elude me . So , sir stranger , thou art not ill-favoured from a woman ' s point of view , which was thy real object in coming to Thebes ; thy hair is long because thou hast never been a wrestler , flowing right down thy cheeks most wantonly ; thy skin is white to help thee gain thy end , not tanned by ray of sun , but kept within the shade , as thou goest in quest of love with beauty ' s bait . Come , tell me first of thy race .

DIONYSUS
That needs no braggart ' s tongue , ' tis easily told ; maybe thou knowest Tmolus by hearsay .

PENTHEUS
I know it , the range that rings the city of Sardis round .

DIONYSUS
Thence I come , Lydia is my native home .

PENTHEUS
What makes thee bring these mysteries to Hellas ?

DIONYSUS
Dionysus , the son of Zeus , initiated me .

PENTHEUS
Is there a Zeus in Lydia , who begets new gods ?

DIONYSUS
No , but Zeus who married Semele in Hellas .

PENTHEUS
Was it by night or in the face of day that he constrained thee ?

DIONYSUS
' Twas face to face he intrusted his mysteries to me .

PENTHEUS
Pray , what special feature stamps thy rites ?

DIONYSUS
That is a secret to be hidden from the uninitiated .

PENTHEUS
What profit bring they to their votaries ?

DIONYSUS
Thou must not be told , though ' tis well worth knowing .

PENTHEUS
A pretty piece of trickery , to excite my curiosity !

DIONYSUS
A man of godless life is an abomination to the rites of the god .

PENTHEUS
Thou sayest thou didst see the god clearly ; what was he like ?

DIONYSUS
What his fancy chose ; I was not there to order this .

PENTHEUS
Another clever twist and turn of thine , without a word of answer .

DIONYSUS
He were a fool , methinks , who would utter wisdom to a fool .

PENTHEUS
Hast thou come hither first with this deity ?

DIONYSUS
All foreigners already celebrate these mysteries with dances .

PENTHEUS
The reason being , they are far behind Hellenes in wisdom .

DIONYSUS
In this at least far in advance , though their customs differ .

PENTHEUS
Is it by night or day thou performest these devotions ?

DIONYSUS
By night mostly ; darkness lends solemnity .

PENTHEUS
Calculated to entrap and corrupt women .

DIONYSUS
Day too for that matter may discover shame .

PENTHEUS
This vile quibbling settles thy punishment .

DIONYSUS
Brutish ignorance and godlessness will settle thine .

PENTHEUS
How bold our Bacchanal is growing ! a very master in this wordy strife !

DIONYSUS
Tell me what I am to suffer ; what is the grievous doom thou wilt inflict upon me ?

PENTHEUS
First will I shear off thy dainty tresses .

DIONYSUS
My locks are sacred ; for the god I let them grow .

PENTHEUS
Next surrender that thyrsus .

DIONYSUS
Take it from me thyself ; ' tis the wand of Dionysus I am bearing .

PENTHEUS
In dungeon deep thy body will I guard .

DIONYSUS
The god himself will set me free , whene ' er I list .

PENTHEUS
Perhaps he may , when thou standest amid thy Bacchanals and callest on his name .

DIONYSUS
Even now he is near me and witnesses my treatment .

PENTHEUS
Why , where is he ? To my eyes he is invisible .

DIONYSUS
He is by my side ; thou art a godless man and therefore dost not see him .

PENTHEUS
Seize him ! the fellow scorns me and Thebes too .

DIONYSUS
I bid you bind me not , reason addressing madness .

PENTHEUS
But I say " bind ! " with better right than thou .

DIONYSUS
Thou hast no knowledge of the life thou art leading ; thy very existence is now a mystery to thee .

PENTHEUS
I am Pentheus , son of Agave and Echion .

DIONYSUS
Well-named to be misfortune ' s mate !

PENTHEUS
Avaunt ! Ho ! shut him up within the horses ' stalls hard by , that for light he may have pitchy gloom . Do thy dancing there , and these women whom thou bringest with thee to share thy villainies I will either sell as slaves or make their hands cease from this noisy beating of drums , and set them to work at the loom as servants of my own .

DIONYSUS
I will go ; for that which fate forbids , can never befall me . For this thy mockery be sure Dionysus will exact a recompense of thee-even the god whose existence thou deniest ; for thou art injuring him by haling me to prison .

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John 21:1-19

Ellie Proctor /
  • Created on 2019-09-11 17:42:11
  • Modified on 2019-09-18 18:01:15
  • Aligned by Ellie Proctor
English
Ἑλληνική
English
American Standard Version
Rainbow Missions , Inc . World English Bible . Rainbow Missions , Inc . ; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901 . http : //ebible . org/bible/web .

1 After these things , Jesus revealed himself again to the disciples at the sea of Tiberias . He revealed himself this way .

2 Simon Peter , Thomas called Didymus , Nathanael of Cana in Galilee , and the sons of Zebedee , and two others of his disciples were together .

3 Simon Peter said to them , " I ' m going fishing . " They told him , " We are also coming with you . " They immediately went out , and entered into the boat . That night , they caught nothing .

4 But when day had already come , Jesus stood on the beach , yet the disciples didn ' t know that it was Jesus .

5 Jesus therefore said to them , " Children , have you anything to eat ? " They answered him , " No . "

6 He said to them , " Cast the net on the right side of the boat , and you will find some . " They cast it therefore , and now they weren ' t able to draw it in for the multitude of fish .

7 That disciple therefore whom Jesus loved said to Peter , " It ' s the Lord ! " So when Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord , he wrapped his coat around him ( for he was naked ) , and threw himself into the sea .

8 But the other disciples came in the little boat ( for they were not far from the land , but about two hundred cubits away ) , dragging the net full of fish .

9 So when they got out on the land , they saw a fire of coals there , and fish laid on it , and bread .

10 Jesus said to them , " Bring some of the fish which you have just caught . "

11 Simon Peter went up , and drew the net to land , full of great fish , one hundred fifty-three ; and even though there were so many , the net wasn ' t torn .

12 Jesus said to them , " Come and eat breakfast . " None of the disciples dared inquire of him , " Who are you ? " knowing that it was the Lord .

13 Then Jesus came and took the bread , gave it to them , and the fish likewise .

14 This is now the third time that Jesus was revealed to his disciples , after he had risen from the dead .

15 So when they had eaten their breakfast , Jesus said to Simon Peter , " Simon , son of Jonah , do you love me more than these ? " He said to him , " Yes , Lord ; you know that I have affection for you . " He said to him , " Feed my lambs . "

16 He said to him again a second time , " Simon , son of Jonah , do you love me ? " He said to him , " Yes , Lord ; you know that I have affection for you . " He said to him , " Tend my sheep . "

17 He said to him the third time , " Simon , son of Jonah , do you have affection for me ? " Peter was grieved because he asked him the third time , " Do you have affection for me ? " He said to him , " Lord , you know everything . You know that I have affection for you . " Jesus said to him , " Feed my sheep .

18 Most assuredly I tell you , when you were young , you dressed yourself , and walked where you wanted to . But when you are old , you will stretch out your hands , and another will dress you , and carry you where you don ' t want to go . "

19 Now he said this , signifying by what kind of death he would glorify God . When he had said this , he said to him , " Follow me . "
John 21
The New Testament in the original Greek . The text revised by . Brooke Foss Westcott , D . D . Fenton John Anthony Hort , D . D . New York . Harper and Brothers , Franklin Square . 1885 .

ΜΕΤΑ ΤΑΥΤΑ ἐφανέρωσεν ἑαυτὸν πάλιν Ἰησοῦς τοῖς μαθηταῖς ἐπὶ τῆς θαλάσσης τῆς Τιβεριάδος : ἐφανέρωσεν δὲ οὕτως . [ 2 ] Ἦσαν ὁμοῦ Σίμων Πέτρος καὶ Θωμᾶς λεγόμενος Δίδυμος καὶ Ναθαναὴλ ἀπὸ Κανὰ τῆς Γαλιλαίας καὶ οἱ τοῦ Ζεβεδαίου καὶ ἄλλοι ἐκ τῶν μαθητῶν αὐτοῦ δύο . [ 3 ] λέγει αὐτοῖς Σίμων Πέτρος Ὑπάγω ἁλιεύειν : λέγουσιν αὐτῷ Ἐρχόμεθα καὶ ἡμεῖς σὺν σοί . ἐξῆλθαν καὶ ἐνέβησαν εἰς τὸ πλοῖον , καὶ ἐν ἐκείνῃ τῇ νυκτὶ ἐπίασαν οὐδέν . [ 4 ] πρωίας δὲ ἤδη γινομένης ἔστη Ἰησοῦς εἰς τὸν αἰγιαλόν : οὐ μέντοι ᾔδεισαν οἱ μαθηταὶ ὅτι Ἰησοῦς ἐστίν . [ 5 ] λέγει οὖν αὐτοῖς Ἰησοῦς Παιδία , μή τι προσφάγιον ἔχετε ; [ 6 ] ἀπεκρίθησαν αὐτῷ Οὔ . δὲ εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Βάλετε εἰς τὰ δεξιὰ μέρη τοῦ πλοίου τὸ δίκτυον , καὶ εὑρήσετε . ἔβαλον οὖν , καὶ οὐκέτι αὐτὸ ἑλκύσαι ἴσχυον ἀπὸ τοῦ πλήθους τῶν ἰχθύων . [ 7 ] λέγει οὖν μαθητὴς ἐκεῖνος ὃν ἠγάπα Ἰησοῦς τῷ Πέτρῳ κύριός ἐστιν . Σίμων οὖν Πέτρος , ἀκούσας ὅτι κύριός ἐστιν , τὸν ἐπενδύτην διεζώσατο , ἦν γὰρ γυμνός , καὶ ἔβαλεν ἑαυτὸν εἰς τὴν θάλασσαν : [ 8 ] οἱ δὲ ἄλλοι μαθηταὶ τῷ πλοιαρίῳ ἦλθον , οὐ γὰρ ἦσαν μακρὰν ἀπὸ τῆς γῆς ἀλλὰ ὡς ἀπὸ πηχῶν διακοσίων , σύροντες τὸ δίκτυον τῶν ἰχθύων . [ 9 ] Ὡς οὖν ἀπέβησαν εἰς τὴν γῆν βλέπουσιν ἀνθρακιὰν κειμένην καὶ ὀψάριον ἐπικείμενον καὶ ἄρτον . [ 10 ] λέγει αὐτοῖς [ ] Ἰησοῦς Ἐνέγκατε ἀπὸ τῶν ὀψαρίων ὧν ἐπιάσατε νῦν . [ 11 ] ἀνέβη οὖν Σίμων Πέτρος καὶ εἵλκυσεν τὸ δίκτυον εἰς τὴν γῆν μεστὸν ἰχθύων μεγάλων ἑκατὸν πεντήκοντα τριῶν : καὶ τοσούτων ὄντων οὐκ ἐσχίσθη τὸ δίκτυον . [ 12 ] λέγει αὐτοῖς [ ] Ἰησοῦς Δεῦτε ἀριστήσατε . οὐδεὶς ἐτόλμα τῶν μαθητῶν ἐξετάσαι αὐτόν Σὺ τίς εἶ ; εἰδότες ὅτι κύριός ἐστιν . [ 13 ] ἔρχεται Ἰησοῦς καὶ λαμβάνει τὸν ἄρτον καὶ δίδωσιν αὐτοῖς , καὶ τὸ ὀψάριον ὁμοίως . [ 14 ] Τοῦτο ἤδη τρίτον ἐφανερώθη Ἰησοῦς τοῖς μαθηταῖς ἐγερθεὶς ἐκ νεκρῶν . [ 15 ]
Ὅτε οὖν ἠρίστησαν λέγει τῷ Σίμωνι Πέτρῳ Ἰησοῦς Σίμων Ἰωάνου , ἀγαπᾷς με πλέον τούτων ; λέγει αὐτῷ Ναί , κύριε , σὺ οἶδας ὅτι φιλῶ σε . λέγει αὐτῷ Βόσκε τὰ ἀρνία μου . [ 16 ] λέγει αὐτῷ πάλιν δεύτερον Σίμων Ἰωάνου , ἀγαπᾷς με ; λέγει αὐτῷ Ναί , κύριε , σὺ οἶδας ὅτι φιλῶ σε . λέγει αὐτῷ Ποίμαινε τὰ προβάτιά μου . [ 17 ] λέγει αὐτῷ τὸ τρίτον Σίμων Ἰωάνου , φιλεῖς με ; ἐλυπήθη Πέτρος ὅτι εἶπεν αὐτῷ τὸ τρίτον Φιλεῖς με ; καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ Κύριε , πάντα σὺ οἶδας , σὺ γινώσκεις ὅτι φιλῶ σε . λέγει αὐτῷ Ἰησοῦς Βόσκε τὰ προβάτιά μου . [ 18 ] ἀμὴν ἀμὴν λέγω σοι , ὅτε ἦς νεώτερος , ἐζώννυες σεαυτὸν καὶ περιεπάτεις ὅπου ἤθελες : ὅταν δὲ γηράσῃς , ἐκτενεῖς τὰς χεῖράς σου , καὶ ἄλλος ζώσει σε καὶ οἴσει ὅπου οὐ θέλεις . [ 19 ] τοῦτο δὲ εἶπεν σημαίνων ποίῳ θανάτῳ δοξάσει τὸν θεόν . καὶ τοῦτο εἰπὼν λέγει αὐτῷ Ἀκολούθει μοι .
Revised Standard Version
1946

Jesus Appears to Seven Disciples

21 After this Jesus revealed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tibe′ri-as ; and he revealed himself in this way . 2 Simon Peter , Thomas called the Twin , Nathan′a-el of Cana in Galilee , the sons of Zeb′edee , and two others of his disciples were together . 3 Simon Peter said to them , " I am going fishing . " They said to him , " We will go with you . " They went out and got into the boat ; but that night they caught nothing .

4 Just as day was breaking , Jesus stood on the beach ; yet the disciples did not know that it was Jesus . 5 Jesus said to them , " Children , have you any fish ? " They answered him , " No . " 6 He said to them , " Cast the net on the right side of the boat , and you will find some . " So they cast it , and now they were not able to haul it in , for the quantity of fish . 7 That disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter , " It is the Lord ! " When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord , he put on his clothes , for he was stripped for work , and sprang into the sea . 8 But the other disciples came in the boat , dragging the net full of fish , for they were not far from the land , but about a hundred yards [ a ] off .

9 When they got out on land , they saw a charcoal fire there , with fish lying on it , and bread . 10 Jesus said to them , " Bring some of the fish that you have just caught . " 11 So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore , full of large fish , a hundred and fifty-three of them ; and although there were so many , the net was not torn . 12 Jesus said to them , " Come and have breakfast . " Now none of the disciples dared ask him , " Who are you ? " They knew it was the Lord . 13 Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them , and so with the fish . 14 This was now the third time that Jesus was revealed to the disciples after he was raised from the dead .
Jesus and Peter

15 When they had finished breakfast , Jesus said to Simon Peter , " Simon , son of John , do you love me more than these ? " He said to him , " Yes , Lord ; you know that I love you . " He said to him , " Feed my lambs . " 16 A second time he said to him , " Simon , son of John , do you love me ? " He said to him , " Yes , Lord ; you know that I love you . " He said to him , " Tend my sheep . " 17 He said to him the third time , " Simon , son of John , do you love me ? " Peter was grieved because he said to him the third time , " Do you love me ? " And he said to him , " Lord , you know everything ; you know that I love you . " Jesus said to him , " Feed my sheep . 18 Truly , truly , I say to you , when you were young , you girded yourself and walked where you would ; but when you are old , you will stretch out your hands , and another will gird you and carry you where you do not wish to go . " 19 ( This he said to show by what death he was to glorify God . ) And after this he said to him , " Follow me . "

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Alcidamas_1.1-1.2

Michel dos Reis /
  • Created on 2019-09-11 03:02:18
  • Modified on 2019-09-11 06:15:50
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Ἑλληνική
Español
English
Ἐπειδή τινες τῶν καλουμένων σοφιστῶν ἱστορίας μὲν καὶ παιδείας ἠμελήκασι καὶ τοῦ δύνασθαι λέγειν ὁμοίως τοῖς ἰδιώταις ἀπείρως ἔχουσι , γράφειν δὲ μεμελετηκότες λόγους καὶ διὰ βιβλίων δεικνύντες τὴν αὑτῶν σοφίαν σεμνύνονται καὶ μέγα φρονοῦσι καὶ πολλοστὸν μέρος τῆς ῥητορικῆς κεκτημένοι δυνάμεως τῆς ὅλης τέχνης ἀμφισβητοῦσι , διὰ ταύτην τὴν αἰτίαν ἐπιχειρήσω κατηγορίαν ποιήσασθαι τῶν γραπτῶν λόγων , οὐχ ὡς ἀλλοτρίαν ἐμαυτοῦ τὴν δύναμιν αὐτῶν ἡγούμενος , ἀλλ ὡς ἐφ ἑτέροις μεῖζον φρονῶν καὶ τὸ γράφειν ἐν παρέργῳ μελετᾶν οἰόμενος χρῆναι , καὶ τοὺς ἐπ αὐτὸ τοῦτο τὸν βίον καταναλίσκοντας ἀπολελεῖφθαι πολὺ καὶ ῥητορικῆς καὶ φιλοσοφίας ὑπειληφώς , καὶ πολὺ δικαιότερον ἂν ποιητὰς σοφιστὰς προσαγορεύεσθαι νομίζων .
Puesto que algunos de los llamados sofistas han descuidado saberes y aprendizajes y son tan inexpertos como los profanos en la facultad de pronunciar discursos , pero se dan importancia y mucho se ufanan por haberse ocupado de redactar discursos y hacer ostentación de su sabiduría con medios inseguros , y , estando en posesión de una parte minúscula de la facultad retórica , reivindican el arte entera , por esta razón me dispongo a emprender una acusación contra los discursos escritos , no porque estime que me es ajena la capacidad de aquéllos , sino porque me enorgullezco más de otras actividades y creo que la escritura debe practicarse como una actividad de segundo orden , y sostengo que quienes consumen su vida en este cometido se encuentran muy lejos tanto de la retórica como de la filosofía , y creo que sería mucho más adecuado llamarlos artífices que sofistas .
Since certain so-called Sophists are vainglorious and puffed up with pride because they have practised the writing of speeches and through books have revealed their own wisdom , although they have neglected learning and discipline and are as inexpert as laymen in the faculty of speaking , and since they claim to be masters of the whole of the art of rhetoric , although they possess only the smallest share of ability therein - since this is the case , I shall essay to bring formal accusation against written discourses .
This I shall do , not because I think they possess an ability which I myself have not , but for the reason that I pride myself more on other matters ; I believe that writing should be practised as an ancillary pursuit . I am , therefore , of opinion that those who devote their lives to writing are wofully deficient in rhetoric and philosophy ; these men , with far more justice , may be called poets rather than Sophists .

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Alcidamas_1.1-1.2

/
  • Created on 2019-09-11 02:47:29
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Akkadian
English
Español
Ἐπειδή τινες τῶν καλουμένων σοφιστῶν ἱστορίας μὲν καὶ παιδείας ἠμελήκασι καὶ τοῦ δύνασθαι λέγειν ὁμοίως τοῖς ἰδιώταις ἀπείρως ἔχουσι , γράφειν δὲ μεμελετηκότες λόγους καὶ διὰ βιβλίων δεικνύντες τὴν αὑτῶν σοφίαν σεμνύνονται καὶ μέγα φρονοῦσι καὶ πολλοστὸν μέρος τῆς ῥητορικῆς κεκτημένοι δυνάμεως τῆς ὅλης τέχνης ἀμφισβητοῦσι , διὰ ταύτην τὴν αἰτίαν ἐπιχειρήσω κατηγορίαν ποιήσασθαι τῶν γραπτῶν λόγων , οὐχ ὡς ἀλλοτρίαν ἐμαυτοῦ τὴν δύναμιν αὐτῶν ἡγούμενος , ἀλλ ὡς ἐφ ἑτέροις μεῖζον φρονῶν καὶ τὸ γράφειν ἐν παρέργῳ μελετᾶν οἰόμενος χρῆναι , καὶ τοὺς ἐπ αὐτὸ τοῦτο τὸν βίον καταναλίσκοντας ἀπολελεῖφθαι πολὺ καὶ ῥητορικῆς καὶ φιλοσοφίας ὑπειληφώς , καὶ πολὺ δικαιότερον ἂν ποιητὰς σοφιστὰς προσαγορεύεσθαι νομίζων .
Since certain so-called Sophists are vainglorious and puffed up with pride because they have practised the writing of speeches and through books have revealed their own wisdom , although they have neglected learning and discipline and are as inexpert as laymen in the faculty of speaking , and since they claim to be masters of the whole of the art of rhetoric , although they possess only the smallest share of ability therein - since this is the case , I shall essay to bring formal accusation against written discourses .
This I shall do , not because I think they possess an ability which I myself have not , but for the reason that I pride myself more on other matters ; I believe that writing should be practised as an ancillary pursuit . I am , therefore , of opinion that those who devote their lives to writing are wofully deficient in rhetoric and philosophy ; these men , with far more justice , may be called poets rather than Sophists .
Puesto que algunos de los llamados sofistas han descuidado saberes y aprendizajes y son tan inexpertos como los profanos en la facultad de pronunciar discursos , pero se dan importancia y mucho se ufanan por haberse ocupado de redactar discursos y hacer ostentación de su sabiduría con medios inseguros , y , estando en posesión de una parte minúscula de la facultad retórica , reivindican el arte entera , por esta razón me dispongo a emprender una acusación contra los discursos escritos , no porque estime que me es ajena la capacidad de aquéllos , sino porque me enorgullezco más de otras actividades y creo que la escritura debe practicarse como una actividad de segundo orden , y sostengo que quienes consumen su vida en este cometido se encuentran muy lejos tanto de la retórica como de la filosofía , y creo que sería mucho más adecuado llamarlos artífices que sofistas .

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Herodotus 1.31-1.33

Lily Russell /
  • Created on 2019-09-10 23:38:24
  • Modified on 2019-09-18 18:13:58
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English
Ἑλληνική
English
Herodotus English 1.31-1.33 Alfred Denis Godley
Herodotus Greek 1.31-1.33
Herodotus English 1.31-1.33 The Landmark Herodotus
When Solon had provoked him by saying that the affairs of Tellus were so fortunate , Croesus asked who he thought was next , fully expecting to win second prize . Solon answered , " Cleobis and Biton .
They were of Argive stock , had enough to live on , and on top of this had great bodily strength . Both had won prizes in the athletic contests , and this story is told about them : there was a festival of Hera in Argos , and their mother absolutely had to be conveyed to the temple by a team of oxen . But their oxen had not come back from the fields in time , so the youths took the yoke upon their own shoulders under constraint of time . They drew the wagon , with their mother riding atop it , traveling five miles until they arrived at the temple .

When they had done this and had been seen by the entire gathering , their lives came to an excellent end , and in their case the god made clear that for human beings it is a better thing to die than to live . The Argive men stood around the youths and congratulated them on their strength ; the Argive women congratulated their mother for having borne such children .

She was overjoyed at the feat and at the praise , so she stood before the image and prayed that the goddess might grant the best thing for man to her children Cleobis and Biton , who had given great honor to the goddess .

After this prayer they sacrificed and feasted . The youths then lay down in the temple and went to sleep and never rose again ; death held them there . The Argives made and dedicated at Delphi statues of them as being the best of men . "

Thus Solon granted second place in happiness to these men . Croesus was vexed and said , " My Athenian guest , do you so much despise our happiness that you do not even make us worth as much as common men ? " Solon replied , " Croesus , you ask me about human affairs , and I know that the divine is entirely grudging and troublesome to us .
In a long span of time it is possible to see many things that you do not want to , and to suffer them , too . I set the limit of a man ' s life at seventy years ;

these seventy years have twenty-five thousand , two hundred days , leaving out the intercalary month . [ * ] But if you make every other year longer by one month , so that the seasons agree opportunely , then there are thirty-five intercalary months during the seventy years , and from these months there are one thousand fifty days .

Out of all these days in the seventy years , all twenty-six thousand , two hundred and fifty of them , not one brings anything at all like another . So , Croesus , man is entirely chance .

To me you seem to be very rich and to be king of many people , but I cannot answer your question before I learn that you ended your life well . The very rich man is not more fortunate than the man who has only his daily needs , unless he chances to end his life with all well . Many very rich men are unfortunate , many of moderate means are lucky .

The man who is very rich but unfortunate surpasses the lucky man in only two ways , while the lucky surpasses the rich but unfortunate in many . The rich man is more capable of fulfilling his appetites and of bearing a great disaster that falls upon him , and it is in these ways that he surpasses the other . The lucky man is not so able to support disaster or appetite as is the rich man , but his luck keeps these things away from him , and he is free from deformity and disease , has no experience of evils , and has fine children and good looks .

If besides all this he ends his life well , then he is the one whom you seek , the one worthy to be called fortunate . But refrain from calling him fortunate before he dies ; call him lucky .

It is impossible for one who is only human to obtain all these things at the same time , just as no land is self-sufficient in what it produces . Each country has one thing but lacks another ; whichever has the most is the best . Just so no human being is self-sufficient ; each person has one thing but lacks another .

Whoever passes through life with the most and then dies agreeably is the one who , in my opinion , O King , deserves to bear this name . It is necessary to see how the end of every affair turns out , for the god promises fortune to many people and then utterly ruins them . "

By saying this , Solon did not at all please Croesus , who sent him away without regard for him , but thinking him a great fool , because he ignored the present good and told him to look to the end of every affair .
ὣς δὲ τὰ κατὰ τὸν Τέλλον προετρέψατο Σόλων τὸν Κροῖσον εἴπας πολλά τε καὶ ὀλβία , ἐπειρώτα τίνα δεύτερον μετʼ ἐκεῖνον ἴδοι , δοκέων πάγχυ δευτερεῖα γῶν οἴσεσθαι . δʼ εἶπε " Κλέοβίν τε καὶ Βίτωνα .

τούτοισι γὰρ ἐοῦσι γένος Ἀργείοισι βίος τε ἀρκέων ὑπῆν , καὶ πρὸς τούτῳ ῥώμη σώματος τοιήδε · ἀεθλοφόροι τε ἀμφότεροι ὁμοίως ἦσαν , καὶ δὴ καὶ λέγεται ὅδε λόγος . ἐούσης ὁρτῆς τῇ Ἥρῃ τοῖσι Ἀργείοισι ἔδεε πάντως τὴν μητέρα αὐτῶν ζεύγεϊ κομισθῆναι ἐς τὸ ἱρόν , οἱ δέ σφι βόες ἐκ τοῦ ἀγροῦ οὐ παρεγίνοντο ἐν ὥρῃ · ἐκκληιόμενοι δὲ τῇ ὥρῃ οἱ νεηνίαι ὑποδύντες αὐτοὶ ὑπὸ τὴν ζεύγλην εἷλκον τὴν ἅμαξαν , ἐπὶ τῆς ἁμάξης δέ σφι ὠχέετο μήτηρ · σταδίους δὲ πέντε καὶ τεσσεράκοντα διακομίσαντες ἀπίκοντο ἐς τὸ ἱρόν .

ταῦτα δέ σφι ποιήσασι καὶ ὀφθεῖσι ὑπὸ τῆς πανηγύριος τελευτὴ τοῦ βίου ἀρίστη ἐπεγένετο , διέδεξέ τε ἐν τούτοισι θεὸς ὡς ἄμεινον εἴη ἀνθρώπῳ τεθνάναι μᾶλλον ζώειν . Ἀργεῖοι μὲν γὰρ περιστάντες ἐμακάριζον τῶν νεηνιέων τὴν ῥώμην , αἱ δὲ Ἀργεῖαι τὴν μητέρα αὐτῶν , οἵων τέκνων ἐκύρησε ·

δὲ μήτηρ περιχαρής ἐοῦσα τῷ τε ἔργῳ καὶ τῇ φήμῃ , στᾶσα ἀντίον τοῦ ἀγάλματος εὔχετο Κλεόβι τε καὶ Βίτωνι τοῖσι ἑωυτῆς τέκνοισι , οἵ μιν ἐτίμησαν μεγάλως , τὴν θεὸν δοῦναι τὸ ἀνθρώπῳ τυχεῖν ἄριστον ἐστί .

μετὰ ταύτην δὲ τὴν εὐχὴν ὡς ἔθυσάν τε καὶ εὐωχήθησαν , κατακοιμηθέντες ἐν αὐτῷ τῷ ἱρῷ οἱ νεηνίαι οὐκέτι ἀνέστησαν ἀλλʼ ἐν τέλεϊ τούτῳ ἔσχοντο . Ἀργεῖοι δὲ σφέων εἰκόνας ποιησάμενοι ἀνέθεσαν ἐς Δελφοὺς ὡς ἀριστῶν γενομένων . " Σόλων μὲν δὴ εὐδαιμονίης δευτερεῖα ἔνεμε τούτοισι , Κροῖσος